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Hi,

I've been seeing this phrase a fair bit at my workplace and I'd like to ask if this is a correct usage of the word "inform"? I'm puzzled as I've not seen it used this way before.

Examples of how it's used at my workplace are: "The feedback received will inform the ongoing discussions and formal tender process separately"; "The strategic futures interviews we conduct will inform our future plans" etc.

I would have just used "guide" or "shape" instead. Curious to hear your views. Thanks!
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AnonymousI'm puzzled as I've not seen it used this way before.
Yes, it's a less used meaning, but you will see it fairly often. The idea is "give form to" in the sense of "make sense of" or "make understandable in a deeper way".
AnonymousI would have just used "guide" or "shape" instead.
Those are also possibilities for explaining that usage of "inform".

CJ
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Thanks for the feedback! This will undoubtedly help us better inform and prepare our future TDY’s.

This will undoubtedly help us better inform and prepare our future TDY’s.It doesn't sound quite right to me to say that people inform their work.In the examples below, things (eg principles, eg compassion) inform people's work. INFORM2a : to give character or essence to the principles which inform modern teachingb : to be the characteristic quality of : animate the compassion that informs her workhttps://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/inform Clive