Commercial translation software technologies are getting better and better. Today the software translation errors are very few that a local professional editor of any country can effortlessly correct them in a short time. Therefore it's now viable for print publishers and sellers around the world to translate their books, magazines to all languages of the world thereby expanding their market, as in more profits.The Philippines is a country composed of many nations of different languages that were forced to function as if they are one single nation by the western colonizers. Business transactions, and college and professional technical books sold in the Philippines today are written in english, but english is not the colloquial or first language in the Philippines. So most Filipinos still find it difficult to read or comprehend complex technical books sold in the Philippines.

Unlike the Americans or Japanese who have the learning advantage of their complex technical books written in their first language, hence their citizens have less difficulty reading or comprehending complex technical knowledge in their books. Imagine if all complex technical books sold in the US are written in French and because most Americans are not fluent or don't know French then most Americans will end up dumb and the US will end up as a 3rd world country.
But Filipinos who want to work in call centers and work overseas or jobs that requires english proficiency are able to learn english and other foreign languages fast because they chose to learn it or because of constant usage of the foreign language.
Sometimes there are english words that have no native word equivalent. Like in Malaysia, they spell the word "science" to its native Malaysian pronunciation "sains." So it's best to spell foreign words in the native pronunciation if it doesn't have a native word equivalent like they do in Malaysia. Like "Pythagorean Theorem" can be spelled in the Filipino native pronunciation "Paytagoryan Tiyorem" instead. Or the word "perpendicular" can be spelled in the native Filipino pronunciation "perpendikyular." Like in Germany they spell the city of Tokyo "tokio" but in the US they spell Tokyo "tokyo."
Language translation software technologies will be very useful in the immediate future in educating children of countries whose native or first languages are not yet developed to convey or express complex math and science concepts, or children who will have to first learn languages like English or Japanese (or languages that are already developed to express or convey complex math and science concepts) before they can learn and express complex math and science concepts.
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sci.lang.translation
Commercial translation software technologies are getting better and better. Today the software translation errors are very few that a local professional editor of any country can effortlessly correct them in a short time. Therefore it's now viable for print publishers and sellers around the world to translate their books, magazines to all languages of the world thereby expanding their market, as in more profits.
The Philippines is a country composed of many nations of different languages that were forced to function as if they are one single nation

by the western colonizers. Business transactions, and college and professional technical books sold in the Philippines today are written in english, but english is not the colloquial or first language in the Philippines. So most Filipinos still find it difficult to read or comprehend complex technical books sold in the Philippines. Unlike the

Americans or Japanese who have the learning advantage of their complex technical books written in their first language, hence their citizens have less difficulty reading or comprehending complex technical knowledge in their books. Imagine if all complex technical books sold in the US are written in French and because most Americans are not fluent or don't know French then most Americans will end up dumb and the US will end up as a 3rd world country.
But Filipinos who want to work in call centers and work overseas or jobs that requires english proficiency are able to learn english and other foreign languages fast because they chose to learn it or because of constant usage of the foreign language.
Sometimes there are english words that have no native word equivalent. Like in Malaysia, they spell the word "science" to its native Malaysian pronunciation "sains." So it's best to spell foreign words in the native pronunciation if it doesn't have a native word equivalent like they do in Malaysia. Like "Pythagorean Theorem" can be spelled in the Filipino native pronunciation "Paytagoryan Tiyorem" instead. Or the word "perpendicular" can be spelled in the native Filipino pronunciation "perpendikyular." Like in Germany they spell the city of Tokyo "tokio" but in the US they spell Tokyo "tokyo."
Language translation software technologies will be very useful in the immediate future in educating children of countries whose native or first languages are not yet developed to convey or express complex math

and science concepts, or children who will have to first learn languages like English or Japanese (or languages that are already developed to express or convey complex math and science concepts) before they can learn and express complex math and science concepts.
Je 4 Jan 2006 00:08:00 -0800, "Rajah Homaba" skribis:
The Philippines is a country composed of many nations of different languages that were forced to function as if they ... and other foreign languages fast because they chose to learn it or because of constant usage of the foreign language.

First ... what is your name? It's hard to write to people who haven't identified themselves.
I think what you are saying is that nations such as the Philipines are at a disadvantage because many technical documents are not available in their native languages.
But what about this: In many colleges and universities in the USA, as many as half of the graduate students in technical fields (math, science, engineering) are foreigners, who do not speak English as their first language.
As a translator, an engineer with bilingul work experience, and a holder of a graduate degree, I would suggest that language alone is not a significant barrier to technical education.
There was a debate in another translation forum last year, about whether technical translations are easier or more difficult than other types. Personally, I think they are easier, IF the translator is familiar with the subject. Good technical writing consists of straightforward descriptions. There is little need for complex verb tenses, such as the pluperfect and past perfect, etc. It's usually not necessary to use anything other than the third person, singular, sometimes the plural. And most of all, words have the same meanings, consistently.

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The Philippines is a country composed of many nations of ... it or because of constant usage of the foreign language.

Of course people who know english or are already bilingual have no problem even if english is their secondary language. No problem with them, of course. I'm talking about the people who can't speak, read, write, and comprehend english at all. Well of course if they too learn english then they will have no problem as well.

And it's very difficult to learn massive technical knowledge just by taking down notes of the teacher's translation instructions and writings on the board alone. And for students to manually draw complex technical drawings on their notebooks. That's not practical, consumes much of the classroom time and exhaustive to the students. It's best for students to read a book in a language they can comprehend or already translated instead of manually drawing complex technical diagrams on their notebooks or having tons photocopies with one by one manually written arrows pointing to their teacher's translation definitions on their pile of photocopies and notebooks. That's exhaustive and time consuming to classroom time for students. And the student will pile up tons of photocopies of pages with manually written definition translations of their teacher and pile up tons of notebooks very unwieldy.
Commercial translation software technologies are getting better and better. Today the software translation errors are very few that a local ... world to translate their books, magazines to all languages of the world thereby expanding their market, as in more profits.

I'm not up to date on this, but I seriously doubt that language translation software is available or will become available in the near future to translate (say) English into any/all of the nearly 200 Philippine languages; or even into "Filipino" (which seems to have morphed into some undefined flavor of Tagalog).
Language translation software technologies will be very useful in the immediate future in educating children of countries whose native or ... to express or convey complex math and science concepts) before they can learn and express complex math and science concepts.

You seem to be saying here that language translation software technologies will be able to translate technical words into languages which have no target-language equivalent of the word being translated ("screw", for example, into the target-language as something like "a metal thing similar to a nail but with a spiral ridge so that it can be inserted into some material such as wood by twisting it in"). I am doubtful.
Commercial translation software technologies are getting better and better. Today ... the world thereby expanding their market, as in more profits.

I'm not up to date on this, but I seriously doubt that language translation software is available or will become ... the nearly 200 Philippine languages; or even into "Filipino" (which seems to have morphed into some undefined flavor of Tagalog).

Like any other money making industry, software translator developers, print publishers, and sellers ought to commission a translator or teams of translators specializing on each of the hundreds of Filipino languages who in turn will receive royalties on each copy of book sold which they translated. Especially with the languages spoken by a viable population size. Good sideline for native language teachers. I'm sure there's no short supply of willing translators for each language if they know they can receive royalties for each book sold. And they can also be the ones to pre-program the translation software to the hundreds of Filipino languages, and the software developers may receive royalties for each book sold as well. Profit venture, book publishing industry.
Language translation software technologies will be very useful in the ... they can learn and express complex math and science concepts.

You seem to be saying here that language translation software technologies will be able to translate technical words into languages ... ridge so that it can be inserted into some material such as wood by twisting it in"). I am doubtful.

Of course human translators will first have to kind of pre-record the native word equivalent and sentence structures etc into the software translator. If there's no native word equivalent, then just spell the foreign word in its native Filipino pronunciation like they do in Malaysia. Like spell the word "screw" to "iskru." In Malaysia they spell the word "science" in its Malaysian pronunciation "sains."
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How do they spell the word "signs?" In general, the art of machine translation has not advanced one millemeter beyond the famous "The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak." (Machine translated into Russian and then back-translated into English by a human translator, yielded "The vodka is strong but the meat is rotten.") The problem is that machines can't think and they can't be made to think. If they somehow miraculously developed this capacity they would also know how to disobey. Modest proposal: Let's teach everybody Latin instead. This is a neutral idiom that even the French wouldn't object to. (Propositum modestum: Potius omnes sermonem Latinum doceamus. Haec lingua est nullius terrae propria quam ne Franci quidem opponent.) See, it can be done.
Modest proposal: Let's teach everybody Latin instead. This is a neutral idiom that even the French wouldn't object to. (Propositum modestum: Potius omnes sermonem Latinum doceamus. Haec lingua est nullius terrae propria quam ne Franci quidem opponent.) See, it can be done.

What is the Latin for 'superconducting quantum interference device' (known to its friends as 'SQUID')?(;-)

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What is the Latin for 'superconducting quantum interference device' (known to its friends as 'SQUID')?(;-)

Or, for that matter, what the Filipino or Tagalog?
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