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Hi

Everyone's sixth sense is different. This is because the sixth sense might be thought of as the imagination or creative faculty, used as a hub or air traffic control station for all five of the other senses, in any combination.

--- Does "used as a hub or air traffic control station" refer to "imagination" and "creative faculty"? So these two (imagination and creative faculty" ARE used/or SERVE as a hub or air traffic control station for all five senses?
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It's hard to say, because it's mumbo-jumbo. Meaning and syntax are entwined, and you are asking about the syntax of a meaningless sentence. The "sixth sense" here is an invention of this particular writer.

You ask what is used as a hub or air traffic control station, I would say that the structure of the sentence makes that "the imagination or creative faculty", when what I suspect the writer wanted was "the sixth sense". You are right to be a little confused. Is it the imagination, or is it the creative faculty? We'll never know. Do not use this writer as a model for your own writing, but he is good for what we are doing now.
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enoon Is it the imagination, or is it the creative faculty? We'll never know.
I think the author is using "creative faculty" as an explication of "imagination".
Or stands for also know as, or often construed as.
Would the text improve if there were a comma, [...] might be thought of as the imagination, or creative faculty, [...], or would this still be a wrong construction in English?

Thank you.
H.
I think the comma would help in the way you suggest, but again, it is nonsense. You can't just toss out a term like "creative faculty" as if everybody already knows what you're talking about and then equate it with imagination as if that's a recognized truth. That is a pretty good definition of "mumbo-jumbo", pretending your made-up, pretentious terms are universal so that your reader will be overawed. He isn't trying to fool you and me.
I hear you.
I wasn't trying to embark on a discussion on the true nature of imagination. Emotion: smile
I just pointed that out to see if that construction (i.e., a parenthetical intrododuced by or functioning as an explicative) would make sense in English, considering that it is often encountered in similar contexts in Italian.

Thank you for your answer.
H.
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Yes. That is how it is done in English. I was just saying that when the sentence is nonsense, it's six of one, half a dozen of who can tell?