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Hi all!
I would like to know if there is a difference between phrases useful to and useful for? If so, then how much?

Thanks for attention.
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On structural level, there is some difference.

useful for doing sth
useful to do sth

useful for / to sb-sth

On semantic level, I see no difference.

The slow cooker is very useful for people who go out all day...
The drug will be useful to hundreds of thousands of infected people.
That basket would be useful for picnics.
thanks
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Ups, I was looking for an answer to the same question
DiamondrgOn structural level, there is some difference.

useful for doing sth
useful to do sth

useful for / to sb-sth

On semantic level, I see no difference.

The slow cooker is very useful for people who go out all day...
The drug will be useful to hundreds of thousands of infected people.
That basket would be useful for picnics.

Well, you could also say, "The basket would be useful on picnics."
DiamondrgOn structural level, there is some difference.

useful for doing sth
useful to do sth

useful for / to sb-sth

On semantic level, I see no difference.

The slow cooker is very useful for people who go out all day...
The drug will be useful to hundreds of thousands of infected people.
That basket would be useful for picnics.
Yes, you would say, "The hammer is useful to him/her/you/them/me [for hammering nails]," or, "The hammer is useful for hammering nails."

I think about this tonight as I write to someone who speaks English as a second language, but is eager to learn to speak English correctly. I wasn't sure and found this forum. ThanksEmotion: smile
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I think that semantically there might be a difference. Consider:

useful for doing
"The pen is useful for writing."
"The pen is useful to write."
The second sounds wrong. "For (verb)" seems to be for the function of an object.

useful to do
"It's useful to do your chores before relaxing."
"It's useful for doing your chores before relaxing."
In this case, both sentences are grammatically correct, but they mean something different. The first means, "Doing your chores before relaxing is convenient." The second means, "Some object is helpful for the purpose of doing chores before relaxing."

I write this correction because this post comes up first on google when searching for "useful for".
Diamondrg That basket would be useful for picnics.
But we would't say "The basket would be useful to picnics."
So, there must be a rule about that!

I guess with pronouns we can say to and for (my guess); but with nouns and verbs, only "for"

This can be useful to/for me. I will take it.

This can be useful for meetings (noun) and for talking (verb) on the phone.

Does it make sense?

Sport is very important for me. I spend two hours
every day in the gym. I am in the school rugby team.
I like taking part in different competitions

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