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I know that using the word "and" in numbers is wrong (one hundred and ten) but I can't find a site that explains this. Especially since and is removed from web search parameters.

Anyone know of a site that explains this?
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XilliusAs a native American English speaker I will agree that Brits absolutely love to use and in their numbers.
It's nothing to do with "love". It's the way it is, in the UK.
XilliusAnd means to add so when a Brit says 120 "one hundred and twenty" I think 100+20. Is this wrong?
It is wrong, in the UK. It means the number 120.
AnonymousIt is wrong, in the UK. It means the number 120.
I believe it is related to expanded notation.
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Sometimes it is okay to use the word and in numbers, and other times it is not okay to use the word and in numbers. And refers to as plus (+) for addition. Just like 2 and 3 make 5. (2+3=5). 110: One hundred and ten. Well it adds up to 110, so it is okay in that situation. 123: One hundred and twenty-three. Again it adds up correctly in that situation. 135,000: One hundred and thirty-five thousand. That kind of situation would be incorrect, because the numbers are not adding up correctly. 100+35,000=35,100. So with 135,000: You would say one hundred thirty-five thousand without the and. And can also refer to numbers that are floating decimal numbers like 123.10. One hundred twenty-three and one tenths.

Don't know why in English why hyphens or dashes that look like a minus in number words have to refer to as addition like twenty-three (23) of where it looks like 20-3=17. Of where it could have been twenty+three that looks like 20+3=23. Just to make 23. Or it would make more sense to not have to hyphenate number words at all, in English.
AnonymousSometimes it is okay to use the word and in numbers, and other times it is not okay to use the word and in numbers.
It's clear from other replies in this thread that not using "and" is part of American English.
Anonymous135,000: One hundred and thirty-five thousand. That kind of situation would be incorrect,
In American English. That is not true in the English spoken in England and the rest of the UK.
AnonymousSo with 135,000: You would say one hundred thirty-five thousand without the and.
In American English.
AnonymousAnd can also refer to numbers that are floating decimal numbers like 123.10. One hundred twenty-three and one tenths.
In American English. That is not true in the English spoken in England and the rest of the UK.
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The distinction is not American English vs. British English, this is a very fundamental rule, and both are the same language (just different dialects).

The true distinction is merely between the technical version and the spoken version. Just because you're not SUPPOSED to use and like that in numbers, doesn't mean we think people actually do so.

And means decimal point. It separates the whole numbers from fractions. One hundred and ten = 100.10, i.e. one hundred and one tenth. If you use and casually in numbers, you will find yourself saying it twice when you try to express a number that has a fractional part . . . one hundred and ten and one tenth.

No website I know of, but what I was taught was that "and" was improper use in whole numbers. Instead it's used for a period or "point"

Ex: 110.15 would be spelled out as "one hundred ten and 15"

In monetary value, $110.15 would be "one hundred ten and 15 cents"

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I'm from Texas.

I was taught in elementary school that while the "and" is commonly heard in everyday spoken English, it is not actually correct to include in a number unless you need to do some sort of addition.

And is a mathematical keyword that implies addition is being done.

The mathematical expression 4+5=9 can be written out as "four and five is nine" or "four plus five equals nine". They mean the same thing.

SO

If you were to write out the number 1150 it would read "One Thousand One Hundred Fifty", but if you were talking about $1150.10 you would include the words "dollars and cents". Adding the cents to the dollars for the total amount of money you have. Even without the dollars and cents and is correctly used when referring to fractional numbers. The number 1150.342 would read " One Thousand One Hundred Fifty and Three Hundred Forty-two thousandths"

I have one hundred fifty-two waffles. = 152 waffles

You have one hundred and fifty-two waffles. = implies a group of 100 waffles plus a group of 52 waffles.

You get the same number either way, but the second way of writing it out or saying it has an implication that you've got 2 separate groups of waffles for a total of 152.

Hope this helps someone.

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