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Is it natural to say "I doubt it" instead of "I'm doubting it" but also natural to say "I'm not doubting you" instead of "I don't doubt you" ? Is doubt a stative or a performative ?
Thanks for your time <3
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Ahmed Mohamed 5361Is "doubt" a stative or a performative dynamic?

"performative" is not the opposite of "stative", if that's what you think.

In the core meaning of 'doubt', 'doubt' is stative and should not be used in continuous (-ing) tenses.

I doubt it. / I don't doubt it. / Do you doubt it?


When 'doubt' takes the meaning of 'calling into question what someone has said', you may see it with -ing.

I'm not doubting you. / Are you doubting me?

But you also see it without -ing.

I don't doubt you. / Do you doubt me?

CJ

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I know it.
I believe it.
I doubt it.
I think so.

These are statements regarding the current state of the speaker's knowledge or attitude. This is the stative form. The continuous forms of the verb are not used.

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Comments  

Good question.

Ahmed Mohamed 5361 Is it natural to say "I doubt it" instead of "I'm doubting it" - Yes, I think so.
but also natural to say "I'm not doubting you" instead of "I don't doubt you" ? Yes, I think so.
Is doubt a stative or a performative ? - ask CalifJim
Thanks for your time <3
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

I'm curious about who needs to know this sort of thing and for what purpose or what exams. I never see this discussed in dictionaries. For translations?

Thanks

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nel0506

I'm curious about who needs to know this sort of thing and for what purpose or what exams. I never see this discussed in dictionaries. For translations?

Thanks

Most languages in the world do not have the equivalent of continuous tenses. If you spoke such a language and you were trying to learn English, you would have no idea what to do with tenses like that.

CJ

Actually, I have trouble finding the equivalent translations the other way around, from English. I've never seen it in any of my teaching or grammar books with this label.

If anyone could list a few of the important languages where this is a problem, please do.

Many thanks!

 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
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