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Hello dear members of the Forum!

I want to ask you something about 'present simple' tense, please. In a grammar book, I read that present simple tense could be used in exclamatory sentences beginning with the words 'here' and 'there' to talk about what is actually happening in the present. 

Here are some examples: 

1) There she goes! 
2) Here comes the bus! 
3) There goes the last bell!

[Dear members, I'd like you to help me by telling me what exactly those sentences say. Does 'present simple' in those sentences imply that the action is happening/occurring as the time the speaker speaks / utters them? Does the use of present simple imply that the speaker can see her going (in #1), the bus coming (in #2), and the last bell going (in #3) as he/she utters them?]

Hearty thanks to all. 
Comments  
LaboriousDoes 'present simple' in those sentences imply that the action is happening/occurring as the time the speaker speaks / utters them?
Yes, or immediately before.
LaboriousDoes the use of present simple imply that the speaker can see her going (in #1), the bus coming (in #2), and the last bell going (in #3) as he/she utters them?]
In combination with "Here/There", yes (hear, not see, in the last case).
Thanks GPY, for your helpful response. I hadn't seen a reply from you to my English questions for a long time. .... Emotion: smile Thanks for replying once again! .
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Hello, I'd like to ask you one more thing concerning my sentences, please.

My sentences were:

1) There she goes!
2) Here comes the bus!
3) There goes the last bell!

I'd like to ask you if we could invert the position of "the bus" and "comes" in (#2), and "the last bell" and "goes" in (#3), please. Could we rewrite the sentenes #2, and #3 above as I've written below?

2) Here the bus comes!
3) There the last bell goes!

Thank you!
Laborious2) Here the bus comes! 3) There the last bell goes!
No, these aren't natural. In these kinds of exclamatory expressions, generally speaking, you put pronouns before the verb ("Here she comes!", "There she goes!") and nouns after ("Here comes the bus!", "There goes the bus!"). In cases where "here" and "there" are not exclamatory, though, it may be possible to put the noun first. For example, "There the man sat, deep in thought". (This feels more a written pattern than a spoken one.)
GPYIn cases where "here" and "there" are not exclamatory, though, it may be possible to put the noun first. For example, "There the man sat, deep in thought". (This feels more a written pattern than a spoken one.)
Thanks, GPY! You used the past tense, instead of 'simple present', here. Do the meanings of the sentences (when in past tense) remain the same as the meanings of the sentences in present tense, please? I mean... your sentence is "There the man sat, deep in thought", does it also mean that the action (of sitting (deep in thought)) happens/occurs as the speaker speaks, or immediately before the speaker speaks the sentence? 

Thank you. 
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"There the man sat, deep in thought" is describing something that happened in the past (any time in the past), just like "The man sat, deep in thought".

"There the man sits, deep in thought" is a description of what is happening now, or it could be historical present or imagined time. It does not have quite the same immediacy or demonstrative force as "Here comes the bus!".
Sir ,present simple tense posses the form of exclamatory sentence as "there she goes" it is true sentence or not

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