Hi,
my native language is German, and sometimes you cannot translate words 1:1.

So in German we have the word "Mitarbeiter", dictionaries tell you the translation:
- employee
- colleague
- staff
- co-worker
and some more..
I'd just like to use the correct word in the according situation.

So I just post some situations / phrases and hope you can fill in the right word in the '...' :-)
1) My company has about 500 ...
2) My ..., who sits just next to me, has the same job like me and is about
5 years in the company right now.
3) The / All in this company start working at 8:00 AM.
4) In our company, 7 report to me, so I have 7

Thanks in advance!
Regards,
Bob
1 2 3 4
Bob Planet (Email Removed) wrote on 08 Nov 2003:
Hi, my native language is German, and sometimes you cannot translate words 1:1. So in German we have the word ... and hope you can fill in the right word in the '...' :-) 1) My company has about 500 ...

employees
2) My ..., who sits just next to me, has the same job like me and is about 5 years in the company right now.

2) My {coworker / colleague}, who sits next to me, has the same job asI do and has been with the company about 5 years now.
3) The / All in this company start working at 8:00 AM.

{employees / staff}
4) In our company, 7 report to me, so I have 7

{employees / staff} subordinates
many thanks for your quick answer (and corrections in my phrases)! That will help me choosing the right word :-)
Regards,
Bob
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Only one question I have:
Am 7 Nov 2003 18:15:25 GMT schrieb CyberCypher:
4) In our company, 7 report to me, so I have 7

{employees / staff} subordinatesI think, the word "subordinates" is not common in use, I mean, a Manager would not tell ... subordinates...!!" I think it sounds a bit 'strange', and this would not be a 'good' manager, just telling this around.

So is this common to use or is it more common to say "7 employees report to me" - and only if he gets a question like "how many employees report to you". ???
Regards,
Bob
4) In our company, 7 report to me, so I have 7

{employees / staff} subordinates

The term "direct report" is becoming popular of the second usage. More egalitarian than subordinate, perhaps?
Brian Rodenborn
Default User (Email Removed) wrote on 08 Nov 2003:
{employees / staff} subordinates

The term "direct report" is becoming popular of the second usage. More egalitarian than subordinate, perhaps?

Never heard of it, but that means nothing. I'm not a businessman anymore and I no longer live in the US. In Taiwan, everyone is "staff".

Egalitarianism in the office is nonsense if there is a vertical structure of authority and responsibility. Supervisors have subordinates. If A reports directly to B, then B is a managerial superior, not an equal. Why create stupid illusions that mask reality? Just to massage egos? That's another reason I don't live in the USA: egalitarianism is about as substantial as a hologram.
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Bob Planet (Email Removed) wrote on 08 Nov 2003:
Only one question I have: Am 7 Nov 2003 18:15:25 GMT schrieb CyberCypher:

{employees / staff} subordinates

I think, the word "subordinates" is not common in use, I mean, a Manager would not tell to everybody "hey, I have 7 subordinates...!!"

As someone else in this thread pointed out, the word is being replaced by "direct report". So the manage says "I have seven direct reports". What's the difference? Linguistic fluff doesn't change reality.
I think it sounds a bit 'strange', and this would not be a 'good' manager, just telling this around.

People who need to brag about how many other people are required to report to them are egomanics of the first order and would probably not make it to manager status.
So is this common to use or is it more common to say "7 employees report to me" - and only if he gets a question like "how many employees report to you". ???

What people actually say and what the management books tell them to say are two different things, I'm sure. What they say depends upon who they say it to and under what circumstances. Such empirical questions are impossible to give meaningful general answers to. You are probably right about the ideal response being "Seven employees (but maybe they say 'staff members' or 'other employees') report to me" though.
Only one question I have: Am 7 Nov 2003 18:15:25 ... would not tell to everybody "hey, I have 7 subordinates...!!"

As someone else in this thread pointed out, the word is being replaced by "direct report". So the manage says "I have seven direct reports". What's the difference? Linguistic fluff doesn't change reality.

There is, of course, a difference between "subordinates" and "direct reports" the manager with seven of the latter could have 700 of the former, most of whom don't report directly to him. It's not just linguistic fluff in this case; it's a different way of ordering reality.

rzed
} "CyberCypher" wrote in message }
}> Bob Planet (Email Removed) wrote on 08 Nov 2003: }>
}> > Only one question I have:
}> >
}> > Am 7 Nov 2003 18:15:25 GMT schrieb CyberCypher: }> >>> 4) In our company, 7 report to me, so I have 7 }> >>
}> >> {employees / staff} subordinates }> > I think, the word "subordinates" is not common in use, I mean, a }> > Manager would not tell to everybody "hey, I have 7 }> > subordinates...!!"
}>
}> As someone else in this thread pointed out, the word is being replaced }> by "direct report". So the manage says "I have seven direct reports". }> What's the difference? Linguistic fluff doesn't change reality. }>
}
} There is, of course, a difference between "subordinates" and "direct } reports" the manager with seven of the latter could have 700 of the } former, most of whom don't report directly to him. It's not just linguistic } fluff in this case; it's a different way of ordering reality.

They used to be "immediate subordinates". That was before they started charging by the syllable.

R. J. Valentine
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