+1
She responds fairly well to Tylenol, in fact better to Tylenol, she said, than Ibuprofen really.
Is the above sentence correct with 'really' at the end?
thank you
+1
Hi,
She responds fairly well to Tylenol, in fact better to Tylenol, she said, than Ibuprofen really.
Is the above sentence correct with 'really' at the end?

The whole sentence is loosely written. It's typical of casual English speech, in which the speaker does not carefully prepare his sentence before saying it.

A more careful version would be
eg She responds fairly well to Tylenol. In fact, she says that she really responds better to Tylenol than to Ibuprofen.

Clive
Comments  
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I would put a comma before "really".
Yes, I think that "really" at the end is fine. (Especially if it is set off with a comma or dash. And if it is pronounced in the appropriate way.)

"She responds fairly well to Tylenol," she said. "In fact, better to Tylenol than to Ibuprofen, really ( = to tell the truth)."
AnonymousShe responds fairly well to Tylenol, in fact better to Tylenol, she said, than Ibuprofen really. Is the above sentence correct with 'really' at the end?
The sentence is hopelessly clunky for two main reasons: first, "really" in this context means "in actual fact", but the similar-meaning "in fact" also appears earlier in the sentence, so there's a double dose of it; second, reference to the original speaker stuck in the middle of a comparative phrase sounds crummy.

The solution is to shift "she said" to the front of the sentence and scrap either "in fact" or "really":

"She said she responds fairly well to Tylenol; better than to Ibuprofen really".
"She said she responds fairly well to Tylenol; in fact better than to Ibuprofen".

BillJ
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I wonder about part of the first sentence of this page, namely the VERY END. There is no need for very because the end is the end and cant be anything else