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1. Peter doesn't usually get up before seven.
2. Peter usually doesn't get up before seven.

Which one of the above examples is more appropriate. I personally think that 2nd example is more pertinent because it stresses upon Peter's not getting up befor seven whereas the 1st example doesn't put much stress upon his not getting up before seven. Rather it only stresses upon getting up. Although when the sentence is read completely both of them aren't much different but the 2nd one (in my opinion) has a greater amount of stress regarding the subject at hand. May be I am wrong. Please help.

GB

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Comments  (Page 2) 
CJ thankx a lot but I am again confused aboud another term from your last post. It's operator. Uptill now I thought that operator of a sentence is a synonym for agent of the sentence. I've just googled this term but couldn't found anything about it. Well can you reassure me whether operator really means the modal verbs. I am just asking this in curiosity.

GB
More than you wanted to know, and more to confuse you!!! Emotion: smile

http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/dick/aux.htm

Google English grammar operator

CJ
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CalifJim The unmarked position for an adverb of frequency (like usually) is after the operator, if there is one, else before the main verb. Any other position is "marked". At least, that's the way I'm using the term.

(Operators are the modals, forms of be, and forms of do or have when these are not the main verb.)

You can usually find one near the corner.
They would usually go there for vacation.
I am usually at home in the morning.
He doesn't usually show up before noon.
I have usually done it that way.
I usually see them on Saturdays.


CJ
Well CJ, you said that adverbs' unmarked position is either after an operator or before the main verb. Then you gave some examples for unmarked adverbs - I guess. The example I am usually at home in the morning doesn't have an operator (since am - form of be - is being used as a main verb). So, was it supposed to be an example for marked adverb or there's still some problem with my understanding of marked and unmarked adverbs.

GB

I am usually at home in the morning -- 'am' here is a finite operator.

Modals are the operators when they occur as the first verb of a finite or non-finite verb phrase.

He can not have gone -- 'can have gone' -- this is a non-finite verb phrase. 'can is the operator

The main verb be and have are operators when they are the only verb in the verb phrase.

Only the auxiliary do is an operator, the main verb is not.
Well now consider these examples.

I am usually at home in the morning. ("am" is the operator)

I have a book. ("have" is the operator)

I can sing. ("can" is an operator) (Notice we have a plain verb - sing - here rather that a verb phrase

as you identified)

I don't know. ("do" is an operator)

Am i right?

And what about this example; I am singing a song. Here we have a verb to be as an auxiliary. So would it be an operator (doesn't looks like one by the rules identified by you). If not then which word is the operator in this sentence. Also is it necessary for a sentence to have an operator.

GB
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"Am i right?" hit the nailEmotion: wink

I can sing. can sing is a non-finite verb phrase.

I don't know. ("do" is an operator) Yes, and not don't
Thanks but you missed the other question. Here it is;

And what about this example; I am singing a song. Here we have a verb to be as an auxiliary. So would it be an operator (doesn't looks like one by the rules identified by you). If not then which word is the operator in this sentence. Also is it necessary for a sentence to have an operator.

GB
As far as I know, 'am' in 'I am usually at home in the morning' is NOT an operator at all but an ordinary verb that carries a lexical meaning.

On the contrary, 'am' in 'I am drinking now' has only a grammatical meaning (says that the action takes place now) and not lexical and therefore is an operator.
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I've just flipped through Quirk's "University Grammar of English" and it says that 'be' acts as an operator whether it is an auxiliary or not. That means that what I wrote above is not true. Sorry for the mess.
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