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1. Peter doesn't usually get up before seven.
2. Peter usually doesn't get up before seven.

Which one of the above examples is more appropriate. I personally think that 2nd example is more pertinent because it stresses upon Peter's not getting up befor seven whereas the 1st example doesn't put much stress upon his not getting up before seven. Rather it only stresses upon getting up. Although when the sentence is read completely both of them aren't much different but the 2nd one (in my opinion) has a greater amount of stress regarding the subject at hand. May be I am wrong. Please help.

GB

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Comments  (Page 3) 
Grammarian-botThanks but you missed the other question. Here it is;

And what about this example; I am singing a song. Here we have a verb to be as an auxiliary. So would it be an operator (doesn't looks like one by the rules identified by you). If not then which word is the operator in this sentence. Also is it necessary for a sentence to have an operator.

GB

According to the grammar book I mentioned above it is an operator.

Yes a positive declarative sentence can exist without an operator, eg.: I worked hard.
The main verb be and have are operators when they are the only verb in the verb phrase.

I am singing a song.

I do not think it is difficult to conlude from the definitions.

am is not an operator, still less it is singing

am here is an auxiliary verb, and not an operator.
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MichalS On the contrary, 'am' in 'I am drinking now' has only a grammatical meaning (says that the action takes place now) and not lexical and therefore is an operator.
"Funnily enough, the two sentence adverbials students of English get most confused about are on the contrary and on the other hand."
Operators are the modals, forms of be, and forms of do or have when these are not the main verb.

This means

Operators are the modals, all forms of be in any circumstances, main verb or not, and do or have when these (do and have) are not the main verb.

[This is not the same as

Operators are the modals and forms of be, do, and have when these are not the main verb.]

It is American usage that I have described above.

British usage allows inversion with main-verb have, so in British English, main-verb have may be added to the list of operators. Have you an extra pen I might borrow? Americans understand this passively, but don't often generate it.

That is why you will find conflicting information on operators, particularly have.
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Yes, the examples I gave were the unmarked versions.

To show be as an operator in a progressive tense context I might have included the following.

I am usually sunning myself in the back yard at 2 in the afternoon if the weather is good.

So now I think you can see why the following statement is not correct.

The example I am usually at home in the morning doesn't have an operator (since am - form of be - is being used as a main verb).

CJ
InchoateknowledgeThe main verb be and have are operators when they are the only verb in the verb phrase.

I am singing a song.

I do not think it is difficult to conlude from the definitions.

am is not an operator, still less it is singing

am here is an auxiliary verb, and not an operator.

Quirk says it is an operator as well.

A University Grammar of English
2.4 Range of operators
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Well guys, I think you all are missing one thing; it's the very basic question. The definition of operator. Uptill now no one has defined what operators actually are. Please do that thing for me.

GB
You should have checked the link that CalifJim gave you. It states as follows:

(...)verbs that allow subject inversion (...) are called 'operators', so the rule for subject inversion is: 'put an operator before the subject'.
I think they have elaborately defined the operator they've been talking about, haven't they?

Verbs that allow subject inversion (and other grammatical patterns to be listed below) are called 'operators'
CalifJimOperators are the modals, all forms of be in any circumstances, main verb or not, and do or have when these (do and have) are not the main verb.
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I think you all are missing one thing; it's the very basic question. The definition of operator. Up till now no one has defined what operators actually are.

Operators are verbs with special properties as explained in the article I cited for you above.

Some authors just call them auxiliary verbs, but that leaves out the cases where be or have is the main verb and still "operates" the same as an auxiliary with respect to negation, inversion, etc. So other authors prefer to use both terms in order to focus on the slight differences.
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With regard to adverb placement (word order) and the terms marked and unmarked, see this site:

http://72.14.205.104/search?q=cache:aYNuGzv8DNAJ:www.anglistik.uni-bonn.de/staff/ofiles/
GLC2-Sum01-Gram.pdf+grammar+operator+inversion+negation&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=8

CJ
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