From newspapers:

"When Neil Dingman recently went on a vacation to Europe, he took his iPhone with him, with no intention of using it much."

"An Edmonton writer discovered that instead of going to Europe, Sather took a vacation in Hawaii."

How is "a vacation to someplace" different from "a vacation in someplace"? Or is one of them wrong?
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Hi;

Both are OK.

I am going on vacation to Europe.( This focuses on the journey and destination)

He vacations every year in Europe. (This focuses on the location.)
MeggPhaggSiouxHow is "a vacation to someplace" different from "a vacation in someplace"?
The combination is not "a vacation to Europe". It's "went to Europe". It's the verb "went" that governs the preposition "to", not the noun "vacation".

He went to Europe on a vacation. ~ He went on a vacation to Europe.

I would be much less common to hear:

He took a vacation to Europe.

It reminds me of He took a sweater to Europe. Emotion: smile

CJ
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
http://www.learnersdictionary.com/search/getaway
At entry 2a, "We're planning a weekend getaway to the mountains."

If "getaway" = "short vacation", could the dictionary be wrong?
MeggPhaggSiouxcould the dictionary be wrong?
Theoretically, it could be, but I don't think it's wrong in this case. Note that getaway takes to when it's in verb form.

Let's get away to the mountains.

Maybe that's why to works well here.

But you think that the to-phrases belong with "vacation". You could be right.

They returned from a vacation to China. / ... vacation in China.

a vacation (they went to China) / a vacation (they were in China)

I suppose it doesn't make much difference whether you say to or in.

CJ

But I still don't like He took a vacation to Europevery much. Emotion: smile
What about "He was preparing for a vacation to Europe." ? How right (or wrong) is it?
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MeggPhaggSiouxWhat about "He was preparing for a vacation to Europe." ? How right (or wrong) is it?
Sounds OK to me. "in Europe" also sounds good.

CJ
a) "He was preparing for a vacation to Europe."

b) "He was preparing for a vacation in Europe."

So, there are truly no difference between "a vacation to" and "a vacation in"? Some classmates suggested that "a vacation to Europe" implies that the vacation starts in Europe. Some suggested that "a vacation to Europe" implies the vacation will end in Europe. Some suggested that "to" is more forceful than "in". What should I do?
a) "He was preparing for a vacation to Europe."

b) "He was preparing for a vacation in Europe."

So, there are truly no difference between "a vacation to" and "a vacation in"? Some classmates suggested that "a vacation to Europe" implies that the vacation starts in Europe. Some suggested that "a vacation to Europe" implies the vacation will end in Europe. Some suggested that "to" is more forceful than "in". What should I do?
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