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A. I need to validate the recorded transactions against the source documents.
B. I need to validate the recorded transactions with the source documents.

C. If I had to lean against one of the fighters, I would choose Jason.
D. If I had to lean towards one of the fighters, I would choose Jason.

1. Are the sentences in each pair above the same in meaning?
2. If not, how are they different?
3. If they are the same in meaning, which is commonly spoken by native speakers?

Please advise. Thanks.
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1. Are the sentences in each pair above the same in meaning?-- I find only A and D correct, though I suspect that B may be in use. I consider this correct: 'validate with (some authority, e.g. the LAPD)'.
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Thank you very much for your answers. I now know which ones are correct.

in any event, “toward” rather than “towards” is preferred

anonymous

in any event, “toward” rather than “towards” is preferred

Every sentence begins with a capital letter and ends with a mark of punctuation.

"Towards" is preferred in the UK.

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