There has been much discussion in Usenet of the peculiarity of speech shown by some younger people wherein they have a rising intonation at the end of a declarative statement, making it sound like a question.
I've heard that sort of speech for several years and have reacted with a mixture of amusement and irritation. But I was recently completely taken in by it for the first time.

The phone rang and I answered:
Me: Hello.
Voice: This is Patricia?
(I would have sworn on a stack of bibles she had asked me if I was Patricia.)
Me: No, I'm not Patricia, and there's no one here by that name. You must have dialed the wrong number.
Voice: No, I'm Patricia, and I'm calling on behalf of

Me: (Click)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
(Email Removed) crossposted to four newsgroups.

About the anti-crossposting myth: In my opinion
crossposting is a completely legitimate and acceptable thing to do if it's done for the right reason. The right reason will normally be that the poster has something to say that he thinks could possibly be of interest to readers of more than one newsgroup.
I suppose there could be other acceptable reasons for crossposting, but at the moment I can't think of any.
(Crossposting eliminated)
Bob Cunningham wrote on 13 May 2005:
Bob Cunningham crossposted to four newsgroups. About the anti-crossposting myth: In my opinion crossposting is a completely legitimate and acceptable ... newsgroup. I suppose there could be other acceptable reasons for crossposting, but at the moment I can't think of any.

That seems to me to be the only acceptable reason. Now, if only we can convince crossposters to understand just what kinds of posts are interesting to more than one NG, perhaps we wouldn't get so much crossposted crap in Usenet.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
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You may have been including this in your reason, but if not, another good reason would be the poster's desire for information that might be found in more than one newsgroup.
For example, I want to know why it is only after I close the oven door that my grease-filled bottom part of my broiling pan bursts into flames. So I would post this to a cooking ng and a physics ng.

s/ meirman

If you are emailing me please
say if you are posting the same response.
Born west of Pittsburgh Pa. 10 years
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You may have been including this in your reason, but if not, another good reason would be the poster's desire ... of my broiling pan bursts into flames. So I would post this to a cooking ng and a physics ng.

Though a devoted regular in newsgroups, my first thought would be to call 911.

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
There has been much discussion in Usenet of the peculiarity of speech shown by some younger people wherein they have ... You must have dialed the wrong number. Voice: No, I'm Patricia, and I'm calling on behalf of Me: (Click)

Now you'll never know. You could have hung up after that sentence was over, 'cause now I'll never know either.
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} On Thu, 12 May 2005 23:43:36 GMT, Bob Cunningham } (Email Removed) crossposted to four newsgroups. }
} About the anti-crossposting myth: In my opinion } crossposting is a completely legitimate and acceptable thing } to do if it's done for the right reason.
You are correct that far and no farther.
} The right reason } will normally be that the poster has something to say that } he thinks could possibly be of interest to readers of more } than one newsgroup.
Wrong, selfish-breath. There *is* no right reason. The best that can be said about it is that back in the old days when people had sense enough not to reply to it it wasn't as bad as multiposting. The best that can be said about people who do it righteously is that they have read the respective FAQ files and have monitored the newsgroups involved for at least ten years and that they commit themselves to following all such groups for the life of google to respond to references to the crossposted blather. The best people can reasonably hope for is that what they post is of interest to at least some people in the one newsgroup they post it in.
} I suppose there could be other acceptable reasons for } crossposting, but at the moment I can't think of any.

There aren't any, by definition. Crossposting is bad, m'kay? Innocent crossposters may be unaware of the trouble it causes. People who are aware of the trouble it causes and still crosspost should be ashamed of themselves.

R. J. Valentine
There has been much discussion in Usenet of the peculiarity of speech shown by some younger people wherein they have a rising intonation at the end of a declarative statement, making it sound like a question.

It's far more common among women than young people... especially in the Southern US, as far as I can tell. As I understand it, it's not so much a question as an invitation to provide some sort of response. Sort of like, "Hi, this is Patricia; do you know who I am?" or "Hi, this is Patricia; will you speak to me?"
Never having done it myself, I don't know for certain, though.

Michael DeBusk, Co-Conspirator to Make the World a Better Place Did he update http://home.earthlink.net/~debu4335 / yet?
But it is normally used on usenet to deliberately destroy newsgroups, by regularly crossposting between unrelated newsgroups. This is usually done by crossposting between the target newsgroup (the one to be destroyed) and another unrelated ng where a controversial thread is started. The newsgroup list often contains a contact newsgroup where the malefactors plan their next attack
See sig for a longer explanation of the methods

Dave Fawthrop
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