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A. How much is the small one and the big one?
B. How much are the small one and the big one?

Which of the above is correct? I am more inclined to choose A because I'm expecting one price for each size therefore 'is'. I'm not really sure, though.

C. It is only a 10 pence difference.
D. It is only a 10-penny difference.

Again, which of the above is correct?

E. Excuse me for a while.
F. Excuse me just a moment.

Which of the above is correct if I wanted to be excused for just a short period of time?
Could you please suggest other polite expressions to say when in the same situation?

Thank you.
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Comments  
Hello,

Please help. I wanted to learn this, please.
Anonymous How much are the small one and the big one? -It is more natural to say how much are the small one and the big ones.

It is only a 10 pence difference.

E. Excuse me for a while.F. Excuse me just a moment. - Both are correct and polite, the latter is more formal.
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AnonymousA. How much is the small one and the big one?
B. How much are the small one and the big one?
When there is a conjunction and, the verb is plural because you are asking for 2 things.
AnonymousC. It is only a 10 pence difference.
D. It is only a 10-penny difference.
In the US, we would say: a 10-cent difference.
In the UK, pence is a very old word for penny. I'm not sure what they prefer these days.
AnonymousE. Excuse me for a while.
F. Excuse me just a moment.
For a while can be several hours. (I'm going out for a while.)

Just a moment is a very short time - a minute or two.
Thank you, Dave and AlpheccaStars, for your helpful responses.

1. In the UK, isn't it that penny is the singular form for pence?
2. If so, isn't it correct to say 'a 10-penny difference' (like a 10-cent difference)?
3. Although I understand Dave says it is 'a 10 pence difference'. Is it more natural than 'a 10-penny difference' in British English?
4. If pence is just a very old word for penny and is also singular, then can I say '1 pence'?
5. Dave (BrE) says 'excuse me for a while' and 'excuse just a moment' are correct to say to excuse oneself for a short time, while AlpheccaStars (AmE) says 'excuse me for a while' can be several hours which actually sounds a long time for excusing oneself, do you think this is a difference in British English and American English?
In addition, if the price for the small one and the big one is just one and the same, can I reply with 'is' to an 'are' question?

How much are the small one and the big one?
99 pence is how much the small one and the big one.

Could you please confirm if the following is correct as well?

99 pence and 1 pound are how much the small one and the big one.
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Anonymous1. In the UK, isn't it that penny is the singular form for pence?
I'm American, and we don't use pence - I was recalling the word from British novels.
Actually it is used in the name of (old) currency - a twopence was a coin.
–noun British
. a pl. of penny; used in referring to a sum of money rather than to the coins themselves; The fare was 15 pence.

For a while, to me, is an indefinite time period, but not a very long time.

I need to do some shopping. Will you watch the baby for a while?

"Just a moment" is the time to finish a short task. (I'm not going anywhere during "just a minute.")
99 pence and 1 pound are the prices for the small one and the big one, respectively.

I would say this:
The big one costs a pound, and the small one is 99 pence.
We wouldn't say that's 10 pennies we would say 10 pence.

AlpheccaStars is correct in saying the excuse me for a while is any short period of time upto a couple of hours. It depends where you are using it and if the listener knows you intention. If somebody says that to me I often have an idea of what they are going to do so I am not thinnking they are coming back in a couple of hours. You could always say, excuse me for a while, I just have a call I have to make which makes the listener think you'll be 5-10 mins.
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