+0
A. I never feel so alone until now.

B. I have never felt so alone until now.

C. I never felt so alone until now.

D. I had never felt so alone until now.

1. Which of the sentences above are possible?
2. If two or more are possible, how are they different in meaning or as to time?
3. If 'until' above means 'continuing up to now' instead of the action 'ceasing from now', which verb tense is correct? Simple present or present perfect?
1 2 3
Comments  (Page 2) 
I'm sorry, I'm confused. If the past perfect doesn't work well with 'until today' and 'I have never felt so alone until today' doesn't sound quite right, then which verb tense makes the sentence sound right?
Hi Anon:

I agree with Clive. Read his answers carefully.
The best choice of tense will depend on the context and what you are trying to emphasize.

Regards,
A-Emotion: stars
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hi A-Emotion: stars,

Thank you for your input. I just got a bit confused when I read 'Doesn't sound quite right' next to my example in the latter part of this thread. I now understand and really appreciate your and Clive's assistance. Emotion: smile
AnonymousI'm sorry, I'm confused. If the past perfect doesn't work well with 'until today' and 'I have never felt so alone until today' doesn't sound quite right, then which verb tense makes the sentence sound right?
The only one left is simple past: I never felt so alone until today.

Clive: B. I have never felt so alone until now. Fine. Not in the entire period of the past.

Note that this one uses "until now."

The other one Clive approved was "earlier today." (with past perfect)
Thank you, Avangi, for helping out.

If the simple past 'felt' is the only one left correct with 'until today', I would infer that Clive didn't approve the present perfect 'have felt' with 'until today'.

Based on my most recent post, I concluded from the discussion that 'have felt' is correct with 'until today'. However, it now appears that it's incorrect and the simple past is the only one correct. Again, I'm confused. Emotion: sad

I would very much appreciate if you could please clarify.

Summary based on the discussion as of posting:

until now - either simple past or present perfect
until today - simple past; present perfect?
until earlier today - either simple past or past perfect
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Hi, Anon,
I don't think anyone can infer that you haven't read carefully.
I'm going to have to do so myself. Emotion: smile

Clive is not presently on the log. I'm not sure if he'll be in later today or not.
AvangiI don't think anyone can infer that you haven't read carefully.
It's just that I'm really eager to learn every detail of the subject. Emotion: smile

OK, thank you, Avangi. I'll be watching out for any new posts on this.
Hi A-Emotion: stars,

I recall you've mentioned earlier that the present perfect sounds fine to you with both 'until now' and 'until today'. However, I noticed that your original post saying this was removed from the thread and another post from you, saying that the best choice of tense will depend on the context, was added instead.
CliveI have never felt so alone until today. (Not in the entire period of the past) Doesn't sound quite right to my ear.
Just to clarify -- and I hope to put my mind at rest in this regard -- why do you think Clive commented that the sentence doesn't sound quite right?
In your opinion, do you really think the present perfect sounds fine in the example?

Hi Avangi,

Please feel free to share your comments and suggestions on this.
I don't think Clive is on the log at the moment, but I'll also wait for his explanation for this.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Hi, Anon. I may have stuck my nose in too deeply already with my position on context. It's just one of my pet peeves. In real life, very few sentences exist in complete isolation.
I think only your original example A. is a true orphan, being ungrammatical.
Perhaps this is hasty, but I don't see anything else here which wouldn't be fine with the right context.
Show more