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Hi

Do the yellow words sound natural?

* There was nothing to cook and she was desperately waiting for the vegetable hawker/ vegetable wala

a) From where do you buy fruit?

b) A fruit hawker comes in our area every day.

Thanks,

Tom

PS: Should I say "fruit" or fruits"?
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wala may be fine in India, but not necessarily elsewhere.

- Where do you buy fruit?

- A fruit vendor comes into our neighborhood every day.

CJ
Comments  
Use the singular "fruit."

As to your main question neither is natural in AmE. Say "salesman" or "vendor" instead.

I take it you are from India or are using the particular variant of English that developed in India. If that is the case I can't give you much help on the specific words you are asking about.
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Hello Tom!

My name is also Tom, but I'm from Canada.

To 'hawk' something means to sell something, but it's slang and not very common.

Somebody who sells vegetables would be a vegetable vendor, a vegetable salesman, or vegetable farmer (as long as he grew the plants themselves).

Fruit is singular, it is when you have one fruit. Fruits is plural, it is when you have more than one fruit.

a) From where do you buy fruit?

b) A fruit vendor comes by our area every day.

For fun, here are some other places you could get fruit:

c) I go to the supermarket to buy my fruit (if you have a supermarket)

d) I go to the marketplace to buy my fruit (if there's a town market)

e) I buy my fruit from the farm (if you travel to the farm where they are grown to buy them)

f) I pick my own fruit (if you go out and collect fruit by yourself)

Hope this helps you Tom, take care!
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

costermonger:

  • a hawker of fruit and vegetables from a barrow
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anonymous

costermonger:

  • a hawker of fruit and vegetables from a barrow

Neither of the highlighted words are in general use in BrE.