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Hi there.

Consider that X and Y are two variables.

The mean of X and Y (is or are) 0.2 and 0.5, respectively.

I do not know if I should use a singular or plural verb.

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Another question is that if "the average of X", "average X", "the mean of X", and "the mean X" mean the same?

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Thank you.

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farzanThe mean of X and Y (is or are) 0.2 and 0.5, respectively.
I do not know if I should use a singular or plural verb.

If X and Y are variables, then the mean of X and Y is one number, not two. For example, the mean of 2 and 4 is 3. I would imagine you probably know this, so perhaps you are trying to say something else, though I'm not sure what. I will leave the other questions until this is clarified.

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I do appreciate your quick reply.

GPYperhaps you are trying to say something else

Yes. I am reporting my study's findings. I want to say that the mean of X is 0.2, and the mean of Y is 0,5 in one sentence. How can I make it shorter? (there are even more than two variables).

farzanYes. I am reporting my study's findings. I want to say that the mean of X is 0.2, and the mean of Y is 0,5 in one sentence.

I think I see what you mean now. You mean that X and Y don't have specific assigned values, but have some distribution of observed values, so, for example X could have been observed as 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.9, and the "mean of X" is the mean of those four numbers. Is that correct?

GPYand the "mean of X" is the mean of those four numbers. Is that correct?

Yes, exactly.

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farzan
GPYand the "mean of X" is the mean of those four numbers. Is that correct?

Yes, exactly.

In that case it should be "The means of X and Y are 0.2 and 0.5, respectively". Note "means", plural. If you use the singular then it reads as if you are combining X and Y to produce one mean (one number).

farzanAnother question is that if "the average of X", "average X", "the mean of X", and "the mean X" mean the same?

"average" and "mean" mean the same (usually), but "mean" is more technical/precise. If you are writing a technical document then you may prefer to use "mean".

In your case, "the average/mean of X" and "the average/mean X" mean essentially the same, but there may be contextual reasons of sentence flow or readability to choose one or the other.

It is standard to italicise variable names.

Thank you soooooooo much. You have no idea how much your clear answers helped me.