+0

Hello

Please help

1. Is to, are to (be+ to), has to etc(auxiliary +to-modelverbs)

Are these model verbs


2. Voice/tense

My concern is if I replace is to/are to/have to with following model verbs - should/ will etc would the rules to define tense and voice structure remain same

For eg.

- this should be executed (future simple in passive voice ) (model verb+be+ objected acted upon)

Similarly

- task 'is yet to' (model verb) be executed -

- this has to(model verb) be taken on priority

Are these (present simple in passive voice )

Or

- he should be doing this

- he will be doing this(future progressive active)


Similarly

- he 'is supposed to' be doing this

This should also be in (present progressive active)

+1

It's hard to understand all your questions. I think you mean "modal verbs".

The modal verbs are not followed by 'to'. They include can, could, will, would, may, might.

'have to' is called a semi-modal verb, but the others you are concerned about are verbal idioms (is to, used to, supposed to, going to, ...).

used to has only one form, and it applies only to habitual actions in the past.

is to has only five forms. am to, is to, are to, was to, were to. They do not occur in any other tense, and they have no passive form.

is supposed to and is going to have the same forms and properties as is to.

have to can occur in all the tenses, but it has no passive.


In all of the constructions described above, to signals an infinitive, and you can use either the active infinitive or the passive infinitive.

active infinitives: to take, to find, to see, to throw, to ask, ...
passive infinitives: to be taken, to be found, to be seen, to be thrown, to be asked, ...

Examples. Each pair shows an active and a passive infinitive.

We used to go to London every summer.
Robins used to be found in this area in the 1990s.

The president is to announce his new plan tomorrow.
The new plan is to be announced tomorrow.

You are supposed to buy your tickets online.
This rubbish was supposed to be thrown out yesterday.

Joe was going to buy that book, but he changed his mind.
This cake is going to be decorated by a famous pastry chef.

You will have to wait until April.
Everyone in town has had to be tested for malaria.

CJ

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Comments  
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That you CJ, this is very helpful

Questions

1. I can use ( is to ) in place of will, should etc for simple future tense but not in perfect tense, why?

I will do it, I'm to do it(though the meaning is bit different)

But not with I will have done it

(Is it because there will be two auxiliary verbs. Is and have and it's wrong)


2. Have had use

Lunch has been had by me (passive)

Any mistakes?

anonymousLunch has been had by me (passive)

No native English speaker would ever say that.

It seems like a mechanical active-passive transformation (present perfect tense for "have," specifically: "I've had lunch.") that might be on an exercise in active/passive voice pairs for a class in India. They seem to employ these kinds of exercises.


There is an idiom: to be had (deceived, cheated)

I've been had. (I was deceived. I've been cheated.)

anonymous1. I can use ( is to ) in place of will, should etc for simple future tense but not in perfect tense, why?

The perfect tenses do not express the future. is to expresses the future. It would make no sense to say "have been to" or "had been to".

anonymousI'm to do it I am to do it.

We don't usually use contractions with the verbal idiom is to.

Also, is to is formal and it is mainly used in newspapers, so it does not normally occur in ordinary conversation.

anonymousBut not with I will have done it

I have no idea what your point is. The future of is to would be will be to, but it's wrong.

anonymous2. ... Lunch has been had by me. (passive)

Yes, this is a passive sentence, but it has nothing to do with the semi-modal have to and the other verbal idioms which we have been talking about.

If you want to discuss a different topic, you should start a new thread. OK?

CJ

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CalifJim

I have no idea what your point is. The future of is to would be will be to, but it's wrong.

My point is that sometimes we replace model verbs with verbal idioms (if it conveys the same meaning) in future simple and future progressive tenses but not in future perfect tense. Why is that?

Eg.

She is supposed to be doing it (she must /should be doing it)

Or

This is yet to be implemented (this will be implemented)


But it's wrong to use it in perfect tense

She would/will have completed the the task

No sentence sounds possible with isto/am to in future perfect voice why is that

(Is it because there will be two auxiliary verbs (isto and have ) in one sentence which is wrong)


Thanks


Also it is true that we can't have model verb and verbal idioms in same sentence

1. Can we use model verb and verbal idioms in same sentence

2. Why can't we use it in future perfect tense

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anonymousMy point is that sometimes we replace model verbs with verbal idioms (if it conveys the same meaning) in future simple and future progressive tenses but not in future perfect tense. Why is that?Eg.She is supposed to be doing it (she must /should be doing it)Or This is yet to be implemented (this will be implemented)

Please don't put your reply in the quotation box. It's too easy to miss your post that way.

The tenses are paraphrases of the verbal idioms. The fact that you can paraphrase with various tenses but not with others is just coincidental. Certain tenses don't work because they don't accurately paraphrase the original expression. There's no magical relationship to discover here.

anonymousBut it's wrong to use it in perfect tenseShe would/will have completed the the task No sentence sounds possible with isto/am to in future perfect voice why is that(Is it because there will be two auxiliary verbs (isto and have ) in one sentence which is wrong)

You can use perfect infinitives if you want a paraphrase with the future perfect.

He is/was (supposed) to have completed the project by tomorrow.
The project is/was (supposed) to have been completed by tomorrow.

However, nobody is likely to say sentences like this very often.

CJ

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