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1. Can the verb 'to pour' be used when speaking of 'solids'?


For instance, does it make sense:


"Pour the leftovers in the dog's bowl."



2. And if not, what verb should be used in this context?



3. By the way, what't the opposite of 'to pour' (and yes, when speaking of liquids)?

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Christine Christie3. By the way, what't the opposite of 'to pour' (and yes, when speaking of liquids)?

The only one I can imagine is "evaporate" or "sublimate" but the process is infinitely slower because a phase transition is required.


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Comments  
Christine Christie1. Can the verb 'to pour' be used when speaking of 'solids'?

Yes, but only with ones that flow, like granulated sugar.

Christine Christie"Pour the leftovers in the dog's bowl."

Only if it's stew or something like that and it's in a container you can pour from. It would still be a bit unusual.

Christine Christie2. And if not, what verb should be used in this context?

put, scrape, dump

Christine Christie3. By the way, what't the opposite of 'to pour' (and yes, when speaking of liquids)?

To not pour. I guess you meant to ask something else, but I can't figure out what it is.

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Christine Christie3. By the way, what't the opposite of 'to pour' (and yes, when speaking of liquids)?

To Drain

Example: Someone puts too much water in the dog's bowl "Drain some of the water out of the dog's bowl."


To Wipe Up (phrasal Verb)

Example: Someone has accidentally let water spill onto the floor.

"Hurry up and wipe up the water before it gets onto the rug !"

Christine Christiewhat's the opposite of 'to pour'

Emotion: tongue tied What?

The opposite is to make liquid move upwards into a container held above it.

If it becomes a commonly seen phenomenon, I suppose we'll have to invent a shorter way to say it. Emotion: smile

CJ

 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
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