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Can’t verb ‘carry’ constitute a sentence of ‘carry + indirect object + direct object’? For example: “The owls carry us mail.”
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eipjoo Can’t verb ‘carry’ constitute a sentence of ‘carry + indirect object + direct object’? For example: “The owls carry us mail.”
It depends who you ask. According to Beth Levin (English Verb Classes and Alternations, 1993),

"There are differences of opinion as to exactly which verbs show the alternation. For instance, Gropen et al. (1989) include the carry verbs among the verbs that do not show this alternation, while Green (1974) cites many of these verbs in her list of alternating verbs."

Levin lists these as carry verbs: carry, drag, haul, heave, heft, hoist, kick, lug, pull, push, schlep, shove, tote, tow, tug

CJ
Comments  
eipjooCan’t verb ‘carry’ constitute a sentence of ‘carry + indirect object + direct object’? For example: “The owls carry us mail.”
"carry" is not used in the way you describe above. Whether there is a good reason for that or whether it is just tradition is something I am not sure of. I'll think about it further.

The owls carry mail to us. Emotion: yes

The owls bring us mail. Emotion: yes
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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
May I ask what Levin's word 'alternation' and 'alternating' means?
eipjooalternation
One of two grammatical patterns that mean the same thing.

1 I will give Mary the money. (One alternation.)
2 I will give the money to Mary. (Another alternation.)

The alternation she's talking about in that quotation in my previous post is 1, which is the one you asked about: verb + indirect object + direct object ~ carry us mail.

CJ
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