+0
Some verbs are followed by -ing, like finished cleaning, avoid answering, etc. If we are talking about finished actions, we can say having done, like finished having cleaned.

My question is that it doesn't seems correct to me in some sentences like:

"He tried to avoid answering my question"

Is it correct to say:

"He tried to avoid having answered my question"



Another question,

"She denied that she had stolen the money"

"Ian suggested the we went to the cinema"

Why we say had stolen in the first sentence and went in the second one, why we didn't say she denied that she stole the money
Comments  


Hafsa
Some verbs are followed by -ing, like finished cleaning, avoid answering, etc. If we are talking about finished actions, we can say having done, like finished having cleaned.

My question is that it doesn't seems correct to me in some sentences like:

"He tried to avoid answering my question"

Is it correct to say:

"He tried to avoid having answered my question" I don't think so... You cannot avoid doing something you have already done (having answered)



Another question,

"She denied that she had stolen the money"

"Ian suggested the we went to the cinema"

Why we say had stolen in the first sentence and went in the second one, why we didn't say she denied that she stole the money In the first sentence, you have to use the past perfect because the sentence is situated in the past, and the fact of "stealing the money" is anterior to "denied".

In the second one, when you suggest something, that something still isn't done. Besides, - and if I'm not wrong - "went" is not a simple past, it's a subjunctive.

Thank you Pieanne, but my first question was about the rule I read it in a grammar book, so when I can use this rule and when I can't?
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
That rule doesn't quite make sense to me the way you state it. Can you copy out exactly what it says in grammar book please?
The book is English Grammar In Use by Raymond Murphy, a famous book I think, anyway, unit 52 about Verb+ ing, talking about some verbs that are followd by ing, and in section D it is written:"When you are talking about finished action you can say having done/stolen/said etc.: she addmitted having stolen the money.

But it is not necessary to use having (done). You can also use the simple -ing form for finished actions:

She admitted stealing the money.'

Could you answer my second question too, I didn't get itEmotion: sad
I see what you mean now. No, it doesn't seem to work the way you phrased it but you could say 'He tried to avoid having to answer my question'. or 'He admitted having avoided answering the question'. It seems that the 'actively trying to not do something' positive/negative combination is confusing the issue here. Sorry, I can't come up with a rule for you on this. Maybe it just doesn't work with 'try'. The book does say only with some verbs.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thanks nona, I think I'll stick to the simple (Verb + ing) rule, without havingEmotion: smile