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The bullying of the 4 year old for not speaking "properly" makes you seem particularly obnoxious. Get over yourself!

What's "bullying" about trying to correct a sloppy speech habit? Did you fail to note the parents are also trying to break themselves of it, and acknowledged that their child picked it up from them?

There's no such thing as a four-year-old with a sloppy speech habit. That's why it could seem like bullying I wouldn't dream of making that accusation without knowing more about the family, but I'd certainly go easy on the child. These parents are doing the right thing in correcting their own speech, if their habits really are so bad (which they probably aren't ): the child will imitate them and those around. And that includes the "Bzzt!" too, which is food for thought.

Mike.

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(often referred to as the "illoctionary act/foce" of the sentence)

The perlocutionary force of that particular sentence being to guide the reader to scratch their heads in bewilderment about what language I was typing in!
Ignoring the typos, I meant to write:
(often referred to as the "illocutionary act/force" of the sentence)

johnF
"We do not have to believe this stuff, just because it was said centuries or millennia ago by immensely famous men."
Educating Eve , Geoffrey Sampson
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There's no such thing as a four-year-old with a sloppy speech habit.

My mother: Don't say "ain't".
Me (aged 4): Why not?
Mother: Because it ain't nice.
Help! I've noticed that over time as a family we ... where we got it. Any other recovering wellaholics out there?

I heard someone interviewed on an NPR program the other day who probably started every response in the interview with ... it's a substitute for "said", e.g. "And I'm like, 'no way'." Sometimes it's a bit of both. It's always grating.

Ah, yes. It's so irritating when one's six-year old child pours his heart and soul into communicating with one but just won't learn how one does it proper. Sheesh!
I am far more irritated by fillers like "like". My ... way'." Sometimes it's a bit of both. It's always grating.

Ah, yes. It's so irritating when one's six-year old child pours his heart and soul into communicating with one but just won't learn how one does it proper. Sheesh!

It is actually possible to love one's child, and to spend endless hours being an excellent parent, yet still find the repetition of 'like' to be annoying. There are times there are so many 'likes' it's tough to follow the rest of what's being said. I imagine Tim wants the best for his son, and would like to break this 'like' habit.
JOE
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What's "bullying" about trying to correct a sloppy speech habit?

What's "sloppy speech habit"-ish about it?

Oh, yeah yeah yeah, the relativism starts flooding right out of the gate...
Blow it out your coal chute, jonnie. It's sloppy
speech. It is, as the OP noted, a mere filler. It adds nothing, and the speech clearly sounds better without it.
What's "bullying" about trying to correct a sloppy speech habit? ... and acknowledged that their child picked it up from them?

There's no such thing as a four-year-old with a sloppy speech habit.

This group is a magnet for prickly buttinskys with terminal cases of disgusting relativism.
I heard someone interviewed on an NPR program the other ... way'." Sometimes it's a bit of both. It's always grating.

Ah, yes. It's so irritating when one's six-year old child pours his heart and soul into communicating with one but just won't learn how one does it proper.

Using vapid verbal fillers is evidence he isn't
pouring his heart and soul, and certainly not his
brain, into the communication.
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Ah, yes. It's so irritating when one's six-year old child ... one but just won't learn how one does it proper.

Using vapid verbal fillers is evidence he isn't pouring his heart and soul, and certainly not his brain, into the communication.

If he was sixteen I might agree with you. Ten years younger than that and you lose my sympathy entirely.
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