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I think I saw a post by Paco a long time ago indicating that verbal nouns (I think he was using them to mean those nouns that have "verb" roots -- Don't quote me on this. It might just be that I am not stating his message in his post correctly.) and this kind?? of verbal nouns can do without the article the. Also, I think CalifJim added that in most instances or it is more prevalent in practice people attach the to the this kiind of verbal nouns. How about the sentence below, is it a verbal noun as in the sense PACO was trying to name it as and is the necessary there?

Therefore, would not it be foolish to think that one can have longevity only through the advancement of science or medicine?
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I think, "the" was used because a certain kind of advancement was mentioned.
Hi, there!

What is a "verbal noun"?

I found this definition:

A verbal noun is a noun formed directly as an inflexion of a verb or a verb stem, sharing at least in part its constructions. This term is applied especially to gerunds, and sometimes also to infinitives (see infinitive mood) and supines.

Is anyone here denoting the same when he/she refers to a "verbal noun"?

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Hi

Verbal nouns have a verb as a base morpheme. If the attached derivational affixes (morphemes like -ness, pre, etc.) change their syntactic cathegory and the new lexeme is a noun, then you have a verbal noun.
advance + -ment
If the rules of grammar require a definite article to precede them, apply them, not otherwise.
InchoateknowledgeIf the rules of grammar require a definite article to precede them, apply them, not otherwise.
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"Also, I think CalifJim added that in most instances or it is more prevalent in practice people attach the to the this kiind of verbal nouns." It is not a matter of prevalence.

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Some terms:

deverbal noun: http://www.englishforums.com/English/TheNightBefore/2/drwxh/Post.htm

verbal noun: A verbal noun is a noun formed directly as an inflexion of a verb or a verb stem, sharing at least in part its constructions. This term is applied especially to gerunds, and sometimes also to infinitives (see infinitive mood) and supines.

verbal: a word formed from a verb that takes on the function of nouns and adjectives. An infinitive functions as a noun; a participle functions as an adjective. Examples: Writing (participle) a letter is something I like to do. It makes me happy to write (infinitive) to my friends.(Used by IK in former posts)

but apparently some persons take "verbal noun" and "deverbal noun " as the same! Is it right??

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I use deverbal noun and verbal noun nearly interchangeably.

I am perhaps slightly more inclined to call advancement a deverbal noun because it is not an inflected form of the verb to advance. advancing is then a verbal noun. But I think this slight inclination is purely idiosyncratic on my part. I would not take it as any sort of linguistic truth regarding the use of terminology.

CJ
That slight preference sounds nice.Emotion: big smile
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