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I have studied an english grammer book in this week. In verbal phases chapter, some questions concerning the usage of verbal phrases have been found as follows.

to choose a pet

Chosen for its intelligence

choosing a seeing Eye dog

Ex

1. Carla waited to hear the choreographer's opinion of her audition. (Original)

2. Carla waited hearing the choreographer's opinion of her audition. (Revised)

3. Trying to get to the airport on time, Josephine got a ticket for speeding. (Original)

4. To try to get to the airport on time, Josephine got a ticket for speeding. (Revised)

5. Snowed in for a week in the mountains we couldn't get back in time to take our final exams. (Original)

6. Snowed in for a week in the mountains we couldn't get back in time taking our final exams. (Revised)

7. To be Snowed in for a week in the mountains we couldn't get back in time taking our final exams. (Revised)

Have any one tell me my revised sentence is correct?

In the meantime, I have found another problem why use two prepositions together in sentence no 5.

"Snowed in for a week in the mountains"
Comments  
Hi Ben,

I'm sorry to say that none of your revisions is correct. Is this an exercise from the textbook? The infinitive (to + verb) and the participle (verb + -ing) are not often interchangeable. Either is often possible, however when they serve as a noun:

To hear music is a sudden delight.
Hearing music is a sudden delight
.

Snowed in for a week in the mountains -- here, in is an adverb, not a preposition, and it is part of the phrasal verb, while the preposition for is independent:

We were snowed in at Christmas.
We were snowed in by the blizzard.
We were snowed in until Tuesday
.

Two prepositions can appear together, however: What did you bring that book to be read to out of up for?

Thanks

Could you tell how to use the infinitive and participle in sentence? Have any rules to guide the usage?

What does the meaning of "out of up for"?

I guess the meaning is "find out it ". is that right?
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Ben, it is much too broad a topic for me to explain in one post, or even several. Mostly, there are some verbs which use the infinitive as an object or complement, and others which use the participle; others use both, and some do not use either:

I want to ski.-- want (meaning 'desire') only uses the infinitive.
I enjoy skiiing. -- enjoy only accepts the participle.
I like to ski; I like skiing. -- like will accept either, and keep the same meaning.
I always remember to wash my socks; I always remember washing my socks. -- remember uses both forms, but the meaning changes.
I feel -- this verb will not take either the participle or the infinitive.

You will have to learn them case by case, although your grammar book should have a list of the more common verbs in each group.

What did you bring that book to be read to out of up for? -- What for = why. Bring up = mention. Read out of = read from (as a source). All together, it can be rephrased as: Why did you mention that book that is intended to be read from?

That's interesting -- I took the "up" literally: "What did you bring that book to be read to out of up for? I was just coming downstairs to read to you!"
Either way, of course, khoff-- I was just thinking of phrasal verbs here, rather than verb + adverb.
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Thanks, I learn more from you. I hope you can help me to solve my further problems.