+0

Which of these sentences sound best:


a) "The fish were stored, and sent off to the market."


b) "The fish were stored, and driven to the market."


c) "The fish were stored, and forwarded to the market."



Note: And I say 'stored', I mean from a boat.

+0
Christine ChristieAnd I say 'stored', I mean from a boat.

That sounds like a wrong word. The fish might have been unloaded from the boat, or packed in ice, or put on trucks, or boxed, etc. In any event, they have to get off the boat. But that aside ….

Christine Christiea) "The fish were stored, and sent off to the market."

Good.

Christine Christieb) "The fish were stored, and driven to the market."

Good, if they are now on some sort of conveyance that can be driven.

Christine Christiec) "The fish were stored, and forwarded to the market."

Not so good in everyday speech. There may well be a business context where this would be good. To me, it implies that moving the fish is part of a transaction.

+0
Christine ChristieWhich of these sentences sound best

a) — but no comma, please. There is no explicit second subject.

I don't think 'off' adds anything.

I should mention that there is something contradictory about both storing (keeping in the same place) and also sending (moving to a different place).

Maybe you meant something more like

The fish were packaged and sent to market.

CJ