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1.


Some days ago, I came across the verb 'to fine-tune'.


And would the verb 'fine-tune' make sense in the following context:


"After baking the cake, we fine-tuned it by decorating it with flowers."



2.


a) Does the following sentence make sense:


"After baking the cake, we deck it out with roses."

or even

"After baking the cake, we deck it out, by embellishing it with flowers."



b) In case the sentences above make sense, do they mean the same as the sentence in 1.



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THANK YOU.

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Christine ChristieAfter baking the cake, we fine-tuned it by decorating it with flowers.

"fine-tune" isn't used that way. You fine-tune a procedure by changing small things one at a time to see what improves it. For example, you can fine-tune your recipe for mushroom sauce over a series of days or weeks by making it again and again, with more or less beef broth, with more or less spice, and so on. When you find the exact proportions of ingredients that makes it taste best, you're finished fine-tuning it and you can serve it to your fussiest guests.

Christine ChristieAfter baking the cake, we deck it out with roses.

Not quite right. Probably 80% of the time "deck out" is about clothes. The other 20% it's about places. "decked out" is probably the most used form of that verb.

Clothes
Michael was decked out in a green suit as the Riddler.
She was decked out in a wetsuit with booties and head gear.
Folks were decked out in everything from black tie to cruise wear for the event.

Places
The church is always decked out during holidays.
The rooms were decked out with antique-style furniture.
Even the lanai area is decked out to the max, with a steam room and a dry sauna.

CJ

Comments  
Christine ChristieAnd would the verb 'fine-tune' make sense in the following context:

No. To fine-tune something is to alter it slightly to make it better, not to add anything, per se. You might fine-tune the recipe, for example, by mixing the batter longer.

Christine Christie"After baking the cake, we deck it out with roses."

I guess you mean "decked". Yes, you can use "deck out" like that, but it seems unsuitable for food, especially cakes and roses. That's just my impression from its usual uses. People get decked out for festivities, and we deck the halls.

Christine Christie"After baking the cake, we deck it out, by embellishing it with flowers."

I wouldn't. Pick one, "deck it out" or "embellish it with". They are redundant together.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.