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1. Do both these sentences mean the same:


a) "He was never enrolled at a university."

b) "He was never matriculated at a university."



2. And in case both mean the same, which is more formal?

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Christine Christiematriculated

OMG!

Christine ChristieDo both these sentences mean the same

Yes, but ...

Christine Christiewhich is more formal?

'matriculated'. Definitely. I don't think I'd use that word in a million years. But maybe it's more commonly used in other places. I don't know.

By the way, you'd do just as well to omit 'was' in both sentences.

CJ

Comments  
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

The University of Oxford is an example of a place where people matriculate.

Look here for details. https://www.ox.ac.uk/students/new/matriculation?wssl=1

Very broadly speaking, enrolment is when the University offers you a place and you accept the offer.

Matriculation is a ceremony that makes you formally a member of the university.

Clive

Clivematriculate.

That's a rare word in the UK.

CliveThe University of Oxford

While it might be in common use there, it's not common in the UK in general.

anonymousThat's a rare word in the UK.

I don't think "rare" is the right adjective. It's common enough in educational contexts.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
teechrI don't think "rare" is the right adjective.

Why not? I can't think of a time when I've heard it used in the UK. I have only discovered it on this website.

anonymousWhy not? I can't think of a time when I've heard it used in the UK. I have only discovered it on this website.

And how does that make it rare? I mean what makes you a suitable/reasonable barometer by which to judge the rarity of a word?