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Some verbs can be either intransitive or transitive.
"worry" would be an good example in my question.

As you know, worry can be transitive or intransitive.

I guess these two forms have different meaning.

I worry about her
I am worried about her.

In the first sentence, "worry" is used as intransitive.
In the second one, 'worry" is used as either transitive or passive.

Could you explain to me the exact difference between them?
I, sometimes, am hesitant about choosing one of the forms.
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IcadiaSome verbs can be either intransitive or transitive.
"worry" would be an good example in my question.

As you know, worry can be transitive or intransitive.

I guess these two forms have different meaning.

I worry about her
I am worried about her.

In the first sentence, "worry" is used as intransitive.
In the second one, 'worry" is used as either transitive or passive.

Could you explain to me the exact difference between them?
I, sometimes, am hesitant about choosing one of the forms. Hi, Icadia, I find this very tricky myself. As a native speaker I know instinctively what to say, but I'm easily fooled when trying to describe how it works - unless I'm really careful.

I believe you're right about your first example being intransitive, and right about about verbs having to be transitive when used in the passive voice.

But I think you're wrong about your second example.

Consider the difference between "I am worried about her," and "I am worried by her." Then try doing a conversion from passive to active voice.

The first one doesn't work, does it?? The second one comes out as "She worries me." Here's the essential factor. The verb has a direct object. She does something to me.

So how do we explain your second example? I am happy. I am sad. I am worried. I am mad about this. I am happy about that. I am worried about her.

So "worried" is just another adjective? Not quite. All verbs have past participles. They're used in many ways. They're used in forming the present passive, "I am worried by you." They're used in forming the past perfect, active voice, "I had worried my mother until she was sick." They're also used as adjectives, "I was worried." How about that?? (Just please don't ask me what they call a past participle when it's used as an adjective. It would be very bad for my blood pressure.)

Best wishes, - A.;

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Thanks. I've got your point. after reading your article, I referred to my grammar book once more. even though the book also provides some information on this subject, and I didn't understand what the point is by myself, I now feel I've got the main point thanks to you.
If you're really having problems deciding if a verb is being used transitively or intransitively, I'd suggest putting the passive voice on the back burner for awhile. Although passive voice has an important relationship with transitive action, it complicates the picture immensely. I'd recommend that you concentrate on spotting the direct objects as a way of distinguishing between transitive and intransitive. Stick with simple present and past tense, active voice, until you're confident about picking out the direct objects. If the subject isn't doing something to something, and if you're in active voice, the verb is probably intransitive.