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Hi there,

I read that the following verbs can be followed by gerunds and infinitives, without changing the meaning of the sentence:

intend, begin, start, like, neglect, attempt, continue, perfer, can(not) stand, love, hate

Can somebody help me with a little more explainations? And are there really no differences?
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DaxiaoaixadHi there,

I read that the following verbs can be followed by gerunds and infinitives, without changing the meaning of the sentence:

intend, begin, start, like, neglect, attempt, continue, perfer, can(not) stand, love, hate

Can somebody help me with a little more explainations? And are there really no differences?

Hi Dax,

It’s somewhat true but not absolutely. It depends on the context.

Ex: She plans to go to London to continue her study. – Infinitive only

Gerund won’t work that well grammatically, though people may get your point..

But if I say”She plans on going to London to continue her study”- then it’s fine

because the preposition “on” modified the context to accept “going”.

She likes to swim for 30 minutes after class everyday.- Fine

She like swimming as a form of exercise. Fine

She likes swimming for 30 minutes after class everyday – incorrect.

I prefer taking / to take the bus to go to work – both are Fine

As I started to do / doing my home work, Mary came to my house – Both are Fine,



She neglected to turn the stove off when she left her house – Only infinitive, not

gerund.



I love traveling / to travel – both are fine

She wants to travel to Europe – fine

She wants traveling to Europe -incorrect

It began to rain as we left for the airport- fine

It began raining – questionable



I hate to wait / I hate waiting – both are fine

Does this help?
I personally do not use the gerund after intend, neglect, or attempt.

There are really no differences. You may as well just use the infinitive all the time, recognizing the gerund when others use it as a substitute.

CJ
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Naturally, infinitive is more prefered. My explanation is just for the purpose of discussion and referance only.
I don't sense any preference for one or the other.
Some people actually prefer the gerund.
There is certainly nothing wrong with either one.

CJ
Hello Daxi

The choice between an infinitive and a gerund for a given verb is an issue repeatedly discussed here.

My rough rules are as follows:

1. Time Relations between V1 and V2
"V1 to V2" is preferably used when the activity V2 comes after the activity V1 in the time relation.
(EX) He promised to teach me English.
(EX) I never thought to see you here.
(EX) I hope to see you again.
In the case of "V1 V2-ing", the activity V2 takes place before the activity V1 or the time relation is neutral (i.e., V1 and V2 occur simultaneously).
(EX) He admitted making mistakes in the reply.
(EX) Can you remember seeing me a decade ago?
(EX) She enjoys learning English
(EX) He practices flying a glider every weekend.

2. Positiveness/Negativeness
When V1 is a verb connoting positive attitudes toward the V2 activity, V2 tends to take an infinitival form.
(EX) We agreed to go skiing
(EX) I want to have a date with Marie Antoinette.
(EX) We aim to please our customers
When V1 is a verb connoting negative attitudes toward the V2 activity, V2 tends to take a gerundive form.
(EX) He avoided getting involved in the acceded.
(EX) Somehow he escaped being punished.
(EX) I couldn't help laughing.

3. Subject
The subject "To V2" is usually the same as that of V1 except when the V2's subject is explicitly mentioned. But in the construct "Someone V1 V2-ing", the subject of V2 can be a different person or indefinite persons.
(EX) She began to smoke / She began smoking.
(EX) She didn't allow us to smoke there. / She didn't allow smoking in her room.

Some verbs take only infinitives and some only gerunds. But there are not a few verbs which can take both. These ambivalent verbs can be classed into two groups:
(1) Group 1 : The sense does not differ between with an infinitive and with a gerund.
(attempt, intend, propose, plan), (hate, like, love, prefer, dislike), (begin, start, continue, cease), (stop), (bear, endure, forbear, stand), (neglect, omit)
(2) Group 2 : The sense or the usage differs between with an infinitive and with a gerund.
(forget, remember, regret, try), (need, require, dedserve)

paco
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Thank you all for answers!

Paco, I like your rules. I think I can use it to explain two examples of Goodman:

! He likes to swim for 30 minitues after the class.
* He likes swimming.

In sentence !, swim is an action (V2) after another action "have the class" (V1), so we should use the infinitive to indicate the sequence of actions.

In sentence *, there are no time differences, or they are overlapping, so we should use the gerund Emotion: wink Hope it is correct.

Is there exist a slight difference between "continue to do" and "continue doing"? In the sense that "continue to do" indicates that you finished doing sth, then continue to do sth. else. While "continue doing" indicates that you are doing sth. 1, then are interupted by sth. else, then go back to do the sth. 1 again?

Daxiaoaixad
I'd like to translate what my grammar book says in Japanese.

Generally speaking, "like V2-ing" is used when the subject has already experienced the activity V2 and known what the activity is like. On the other hand, "like to V2" is rather a future-oriented expression.

Suppose a girl made a composition and suppose there were two alternatives for it as follows:
(1) I am a girl. I like being a girl. But I don't like to be treated as a girl. I like to be treated as a person.
(2) I am a girl. I like to be a girl. But I don't like being treated as a girl. I like being treated as a person.
When the two are compared, (1) is more natural than (2).

paco
I must say, the two sentences


(1) I am a girl. I like being a girl. But I don't like to be treated as a girl. I like to be treated as a person.
(2) I am a girl. I like to be a girl. But I don't like being treated as a girl. I like being treated as a person.

are quite confusing Emotion: wink

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