'Those like the customer in my local butchers pointing out she didn't only support Chelsea as consider them part of the family.' Could anybody tell me if the phrase 'pointing out she didn't' disqualifies 'did' (as in didn't) as a finite verb, and therefore renders the sentence gramattically incorrect ( as to be considered viable, a semtence needs a finite verb)? I'm asking in respect of the infinitive 'pointing' being the head word in the phrase?
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To answer as specifically as I can, no: _didn't _ is a finite verb in this text.

Looking just at the phrase, "pointing out she didn't," it looks like an adverbial clause was intended there, but the structure of the clause is not correct. I think that the intent was to chracterize a customer at the butcher shop, identifying that customer as one who pointed out her particular level of support for Chelsea... The phrase isn't structured in a way that definitely says that, and after that part of the writing, the intension becomes even less clear.

If I could tell what the passage was trying to say, I could offer a correct way of saying it, but I cannot tell at all what is intended here.
Those (people) like the customer in my local butchers (who was) pointing out (that) she didn't only support Chelsea but as consider them (as) part of the family.'

I read this as a fragment, with a subject and a modifying complex clause.
There is no predicate.
The confusing aspect is that a lot of the structural words have been omitted. I've put them in parentheses. In English, omission of structural words can be OK, but it can mask the grammatical errors.
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AnonymousTo answer as specifically as I can, no: _didn't _ is a finite verb in this text.Looking just at the phrase, "pointing out she didn't," it looks like an adverbial clause was intended there, but the structure of the clause is not correct. I think that the intent was to chracterize a customer at the butcher shop, identifying that customer as one who pointed out her particular level of support for Chelsea... The phrase isn't structured in a way that definitely says that, and after that part of the writing, the intension becomes even less clear.If I could tell what the passage was trying to say, I could offer a correct way of saying it, but I cannot tell at all what is intended here.
Thanks for the reply. The question was hastily consctucted and shold not have been sent, i.e semtence and the gerund pointing defined as an infinitive!!! As I understand things, a post can be edited within an hour from having been sent. How is this done, can anyone tell me? To the questions at hand - I was under the impression that a verb phrase is defined by the head word. For example, is it not correct that having seen, to be called upon etc, that such word groupings, on account of the head-words having and to are defined as non-finite verbs. So by virtue of the same logic(?), I was wondering if pointing out she didn't, if the gerund pointing did not have a knock-on effect to render didn't as part of the non-finite verb pointing (despite the pronoun she sandwiched in between)?
As far as what the passage is trying to say, if, as you contend, didn't is a finite verb, then I think the sentence is sound. To explain it basically - The woman in the shop was one who, taking the trouble to point out the extent of her 'fanaticism', confirmed a certain suspicion (on my part). This would be in relation to the preceeding sentnece allowing for how a person can sometimes be taken aback by the extent of some football supporters devotion to their team. Maybe it could be phrased better!?
AlpheccaStarsThere is no predicate.
Isn't ' didn't only support' a predicate?
JIM1984Isn't ' didn't only support' a predicate?
Yes, it is the predicate in the noun clause that is the direct object of the (phrasal) present participle "pointing out."
It is not the predicate in the main clause. The main clause has no predicate.

Here is the original:

Those (people) like the customer in my local butchers (who was) pointing out (that) she didn't only support Chelsea but consider them (as) part of the family.'

The following rewrite makes it a full sentence. The finite verb is "are pointing out." The verb has to be changed to the plural as well as the pronoun in the dependent noun clause. The verbs in this clause should be the same tense.

Those like the customer in my local butchers are pointing out that they don't only support Chelsea but consider them part of the family.'

Those like the customer in my local butchers are pointing out that they didn't only support Chelsea but considered them part of the family.'
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AlpheccaStars
JIM1984Isn't ' didn't only support' a predicate?
Yes, it is the predicate in the noun clause that is the direct object of the (phrasal) present participle "pointing out."It is not the predicate in the main clause. The main clause has no predicate.Here is the original:Those (people) like the customer in my local butchers (who was) pointing out (that) she didn't only support Chelsea but consider them (as) part of the family.'The following rewrite makes it a full sentence. The finite verb is "are pointing out." The verb has to be changed to the plural as well as the pronoun in the dependent noun clause. The verbs in this clause should be the same tense.Those like the customer in my local butchers are pointing out that they don't only support Chelsea but consider them part of the family.'Those like the customer in my local butchers are pointing out that they didn't only support Chelsea but considered them part of the family.'
Thanks very much for the time spent, but that last finished sentence of yours is about as far away from what I intend as to be meaningless. Allow me, when with the preceding sentence - The level of dedication experienced by some football fans can frequently take one aback. Those, like the woman in my local butchers pointing out she didn't only support Chelsea as consider them part of the family. I am a long way from being a grammarian, and I don't want to, just yet, get into too much discussion until I have more of a grasp on the subject. However, taken in context, the bolded words exampled above strike me as passable enough. By all means, feel free to comment further. And, thanks again.
AlpheccaStars
JIM1984Isn't ' didn't only support' a predicate?
Yes, it is the predicate in the noun clause that is the direct object of the (phrasal) present participle "pointing out."It is not the predicate in the main clause. The main clause has no predicate.Here is the original:Those (people) like the customer in my local butchers (who was) pointing out (that) she didn't only support Chelsea but consider them (as) part of the family.'The following rewrite makes it a full sentence. The finite verb is "are pointing out." The verb has to be changed to the plural as well as the pronoun in the dependent noun clause. The verbs in this clause should be the same tense.Those like the customer in my local butchers are pointing out that they don't only support Chelsea but consider them part of the family.'Those like the customer in my local butchers are pointing out that they didn't only support Chelsea but considered them part of the family.'
Actually I can see now my 'sentence' viewed as 'passable' doesn't quite stand up. It's late and I'm tired, but I'll get back tomorrow. Bon soir!
Those, like the woman in my local butchers pointing out she didn't only support Chelsea as consider them part of the family.

If you take out the phrase beginning with "like the woman", what would you say? Maybe one of these (main verb is underlined):

Those (people) supported Chelsea and consider them part of the family.
Those (people) point out that they support Chelsea and consider them part of the family.
Those (people) are ( like the woman......)

After you write the main clause, add the phrase "like the woman in my local butchers...", and you will be just fine.

Regards,
A-Emotion: stars
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