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A textbook says that with these verbs the indirect object (usually a person) stands at the end. ( I explained the decision to him) admit, announce, demonstrate,
explain, introduce, mention, point out,
prove, report, say, suggest, propose. Recently I was reading a book and realised that the verb to reveal works in the same pattern ( he revealed his truth to them, he revealed them his truth.) Are there any other verbs not mentioned in the list that can fit into the list?

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I can always detect a non-native speaker if they use ditransitive verbs in an odd fashion.

For example: Explain me please. rather than "Explain it to me please."

Use a corpus or dictionary for examples of natural usage.

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VladvA textbook says that with these verbs the indirect object (usually a person) stands at the end. ( I explained the decision to him)

"indirect object" usually refers to e.g. "him" in "I gave him a book". I can't find many (or even any) definitions of "indirect object" that extend it to your pattern with "to ~".

VladvAre there any other verbs not mentioned in the list that can fit into the list?

In the pattern with "to ~", yes, lots. "donate", "award", "bequeath", "grant", "present", "offer", "show", "submit", "transfer", "cede", "disclose", "recommend", "release", "submit", "feed", "supply", "deliver", "dispense", "send" and "lend" are just a few that I can reel off. Some of these also allow use with a "true" indirect object, e.g. "I sent a letter to him" / "I sent him a letter", while others do not, e.g. "I submitted an application to him" but not "I submitted him an application".

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Vladv,

You need to get yourself a copy of Beth Levin's English Verb Classes and Alternations: A Preliminary Investigation (The University of Chicago Press).

From your posts it seems to me that you are trying to rewrite her book.

Here's what she lists for Non-Alternating Ditransitive Verbs (to Only):

(Primarily Latinate verbs) address, administer, broadcast, convey, contribute, delegate, deliver, denounce, demonstrate, describe, dictate, dispatch, display, distribute, donate, elucidate, exhibit, express, explain, explicate, forfeit, illustrate, introduce, narrate, portray, proffer, recite, recommend, refer, reimburse, remit, restore, return, sacrifice, submit, surrender, transfer, transport

There are other non-alternating verbs discussed there as well, but the lists are too long to reproduce here.

CJ

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Vladv
VladvA textbook says that with these verbs the indirect object (usually a person) stands at the end. ( I explained the decision to him) admit, announce, demonstrate, explain, introduce, mention, point out, prove, report, say, suggest, propose.

There are many exceptions to that. For example, it's perfectly OK to say 'I admitted to him that I'd lied', 'I mentioned to her that she'd forgotten my birthday', 'I can prove to you that you're wrong' etc.


 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
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So it is ok to say I explained to him that/why.... I announced to them that the be killed, I demonstrated to him why I was angry? He revealed to them when the End would come

 GPY's reply was promoted to an answer.

Which of the verbs you kindly mentioned work in the pattern "I submitted an application to him" but not "I submitted him an application".?

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Vladv

Which of the verbs you kindly mentioned work in the pattern "I submitted an application to him" but not "I submitted him an application".?

The ones on my list that do not allow a "true" indirect object, i.e. do not allow the pattern like "I gave him a book", are: "donate", "present", "submit", "transfer", "disclose", "recommend", "release", "submit", "supply"(?), "deliver"(?), "dispense"(?).

Some of these are borderline. E.g. "recommend him a lawyer" is now increasingly used even by native speakers, though traditionally it is considered an error. Opinions about "supply", "deliver" and "dispense" might vary.

GPY"recommend him a lawyer" is now increasingly used even by native speakers

Yes, I believe we've had more than our fair share of those appear on the forum. It sounds wrong to me as shown above and with 'to'. I'd say 'for', though that's probably borderline or wrong for some speakers as well.

recommend him a lawyer
recommend a lawyer to him
recommend a lawyer for him

Truth be told, depending on the exact meaning desired, I'd probably go with something more like the following.

Recommend that he retain [name] as his lawyer.
or
Recommend that he retain a lawyer.

CJ

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