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Hi,

I'm a space cadet to some degree.

Once in a while I notice "verify answer" and "verified answer" here and there on this forum.

So, does "verify answer" means "(the thread starter) proves/confirms the answer (by a contributor) is good/true?"

And "verified answer" means "the answer has been confirmed/proven to be true/good?" Thanks.
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AngliholicSo, does "verify answer" means mean "(the thread starter) proves/confirms the answer (by a contributor) is good/true?"
Close, but no cigar. It means that anyone, but particularly a moderator or native speaker, who agrees with the answer can confirm that it is a correct answer. verify is an imperative here. (Verify this answer by clicking on the word Verify.)
AngliholicAnd "verified answer" means "the answer has been confirmed/proven to be true/good?"
Yes. verified is a past participle here. (has been verified)

CJ
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"Close, but no cigar" is an idiom that means, "Close, but not exactly right". (You didn't win a cigar for your efforts, I suppose, is the origin of the expression -- I think. There's probably a website somewhere that explains the origin of the saying.)

A moderator is someone who has various authorities that other members don't have. I, for example, am a moderator. We can delete posts, move posts, and so on. There is an icon next to our names that indicates that we are moderators.

CJ
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Comments  
CalifJim Close, but no cigar. It means that anyone, but particularly a moderator or native speaker, who agrees with the answer can confirm that it is a correct answer. verify is an imperative here. (Verify this answer by clicking on the word Verify.)

CJ

[/quote

Thanks, CJ.

Got it!

By the way, what did you mean by "no cigar" in your reply?

Besides, what exactly does "moderator" refer to on a forum?

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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