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Other writers of the period, including Thomas Nashe, ridiculed Marlowe’s innovations [that he made in his Tamburlaine] as ‘the swelling bombast of a bragging blank verse’, dismissing them as ‘the spacious volubility of a drumming decasillabon [line with ten syllables]’. Marlowe’s great rival Robert Greene went even further, complaining that Marlowe’s innovations were putting him out of business, ‘for that I could not make my verses jet upon the stage in tragical buskins [boots often worn by actors], every word filling the mouth like the faburden [monotonous musical refrain] of Bow‑ Bell, daring God out of heaven with that atheist Tamburlaine’."


Can you paraphrase the emphasized part?


The source: This Orient Isle- Elizabethan England and the Islamic World by Jerry Brotton


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because (for that) I could not make my verses strut (an obsolete sense of "jet") upon the stage in tragical buskins (a kind of footwear symbolic of tragic drama), every word filling the mouth like the refrain (faburden, an obsolete word for various harmonic passages in music) of Bow-bells (Bow-Bell, the famous bells of St. Mary-le-Bow in Cheapside, London, with the added implication of loudness), scaring (obsolete "dare", a different word from the usual one) God out of Heaven with that atheist Tamerlane (the modern spelling).