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Hi everybody! Could you tell me if it is correct the following:

Usually, “Very” is used with adjectives, adverbs, and present participle (ending in ing). “Much” is used with comparatives past participles. For instance:

She is a very happy girl. (adjective)
He acted very meanly. (adverb)
That boss is much dear by his workers than the former one. (comparative)
That teacher is much loved by his pupils. (past participle).

But I cannot find an example of the use of “very” with present participle ending in ing! Could you help me, please?

Eladio

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Old EladioUsually, “Very” is used with adjectives, adverbs, and present participle (ending in ing). “Much” is used with comparatives past participles. For instance:

She is a very happy girl. (adjective)

He acted very meanly. (adverb)

That boss is much dear by his workers than the former one. (comparative)This sentence is grammatically incorrect. Here is an alternative:
The new boss is much nicer to his workers than the former one was.

That teacher is much loved by his pupils. (past participle).

But I cannot find an example of the use of “very” with present participle ending in ing! That is very surprising!Emotion: wink


Hi Old Eladio
There are a few comments in the quote (in red).
Thank you, Yankee! (A Cuban saying thank you to a Yankee, and a Yankee helping a Cuban, that's a little step forward; our little contribution to an understanding between our nations and the two people, right?)

Now, about your comments: OK with the boss's sentence. But about your sentence "That's very surprising" I think that "surprising" is an adjective itself rather than a present participle, although it is as well. But I'm looking for "a pure" present participle, I mean, the present participle of a verb that we could transform into an adjective by using the ing and does not exist as an adjective itself. Do you understand me now?

Eladio
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I think 'surprising' is an adjective as well. My first reaction was to say 'that is an interesting question' until I realised that that too is an adjective.

It's hard to think of an example.
Try looking very closely to the word order.
I was thinking that too but doesn't the very modify the adverb 'closely' instead of the 'looking'.
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Thanks anyway, Wwwdotcom, but not. Your example does not work. I am looking for (very+verb-ing), and you have gave such a sort of a mixture of ing and very in the same sentence.

Eladio
very, verb, ing? Well, I was very trying, but that doesn't sound right. Where did you hear of this formula?
Maybe the following sentence reflects what I am looking for: "Altogether it was a fun weekend, and a very achieving one"

How do you think, friends from EF?

Eladio
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