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a)There are much many apples.

b)There are very many apples.

c)There is more many apples

d)There is many much paper on the table.

e)There is very much paper on the table.

f)There is more much paper on the table.

Do these four sentences right? What is the different between a,b and c?(d),(e) and (f)?

e)There is much/many more apples on the table than on the floor. << much, many or both are right?

Thank you
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Briefly,

The correct way to ask this question is; What is the difference between....

With your sentences, 'many much' is never used.
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Nice work Nanita. You are quite correct, but in modern English, much and many are usually used in negative sentences, and in questions;

Negative; "Is there much stolen money?" "No, there is not much stolen money"
Positive: "Is there much stolen money?" "Yes, there is a lot of stolen money"

Negative; "Were there many apples?" "No, there were not many apples"
Positive; "Were there many apples?" "Yes, there were a lot of apples"

Using many and much in positive sentences is not wrong, but it sounds a little unusual.

Cheers :-)
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Comments  
Anonymousa)There are much many apples. many

b)There are very many apples. many

c)There is more many apples are many more

d)There is many much paper on the table. Correct is: There are many papers on the table.

e)There is very much papers on the table. are many papers

There is more much papers on the table. are many more papers

Do Are these four sentences right? What is the different between a,b and c?(d),(e) and (f)?

e)There is are much/many more apples on the table than on the floor. << much, many or both are right? are many more apples

Thank you
What is the different between a,b and c?(d),(e) and (f)?

and I also would say: which/what is the difference between.....?

what do u think about it?
 nona the brit's reply was promoted to an answer.
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much > uncountable nouns "There is much robed money"
many > countable nouns "There are many apples"
very > is used before adjective "You are very bored"

there is > singular > uncoutable nouns
there are > plural > countable nouns

I think that it is so. or is there more something? Emotion: embarrassed

 Mike in Japan's reply was promoted to an answer.