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The first sentence in the first article of one of my journals is "I recently visited with my friend, Sam Roymond, in his kitchen near Woods Hole, Massachusetts"

At the first glance, I was puzzled by using "visited with", but using "visited" my friend. After reading carfully the sentecne again, I realized the phrase of "in his kitchen".

By looking up it in an online dictionary, I find the "visited with" here equals to "interviewed" or "talked with".

More examples:

Mrs. Laura Bush visited with patients and their family members at the Korle-Bu Treatment Center, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2006 in Accra,


Congressman George Miller visited with students at an event for Upward Bound on ...

A Visit With Castro.

"A Visit with Mrs. G"

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American English: "I recently visited with my friend, Sam Roymond, in his kitchen near Woods Hole, Massachusetts" and "Mrs. Laura Bush visited with patients and their family members at the Korle-Bu Treatment Center".

British English: "I recently visited my friend, Sam Roymond, in his kitchen near Woods Hole, Massachusetts" and "Mrs. Laura Bush visited patients and their family members at the Korle-Bu Treatment Center".

"Visited"? Or "visited with"? It depends on where you are in the world Emotion: smile
Hello Ouc

It's not very common in British English; I think in American English it implies "to visit and converse with amicably".

(But I'm open to correction.)

MrP
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Yes, a nice description, Mr. P.

I enjoyed a nice visit with my parents.

In the South, visit isn't even transitive. What did you do? We just visited. (Sat and talked.)
I didnt get the point, both US and UK expressions mean the same thing?
Mr. P said that "visit with" isn't used much in the UK.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Grammar GeekMr. P said that "visit with" isn't used much in the UK.
Yes; I would only expect to hear "meet with" from a BrE-speaker who had much to do with AmE-speakers (or watched a lot of US tv).

MrP
"Visited with" is mainly used in the US, and countries with a connection to the US.

In the UK, and countries with a colonial connection to the UK, it's more usual to say, for example, "I'm going to visit my friends"; NOT "I'm going to visit with my friends."

Don't worry about which one to use Emotion: smile