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Hi

Is there any difference between the following sentences in terms of meaning?

He visited his mother every saturday.

He used to visit his mother every saturday.

Thanks.
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Here, not really, but the idiomatic 'used to' adds the suggestion of a past habit.
if you use "He visited his mother every saturday" he will contined that job

else you use "He used to visited his mother every saturday" means previousdays he was done but not now.
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Hello, Lakshman-- and welcome to English Forums.

I'm afraid that you are wrong about 'he visited'. That verb is in simple past tense and says nothing whatsoever about continuing the job; in fact, it implies the contrary-- that he no longer does that. Perhaps you are thinking of present perfect simple, 'has visited', or present perfect progressive, 'has been visiting'– but neither of those implies that he will continue, either, although 'has been visiting' brings the activity up to the current Saturday.
Mister MicawberHello, Lakshman-- and welcome to English Forums.I'm afraid that you are wrong about 'he visited'. That verb is in simple past tense and says nothing whatsoever about continuing the job; in fact, it implies the contrary-- that he no longer does that.
Not really; it's ambiguous and could be used in either case - whether the visits are continuing or have ceased. 'Used to visit' means that the visits have ended, though.
Hello Joe and Lakshman, and welcome to English Forums.

Joe, I can't agree that it's ambiguous. It carries a strong implication that this habit has ended. Is it possible that he still does? Yes, but if you asked me what my inference was, it would certainly be that he no longer does.
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thanks for your repaly

i did not know tha pastence featuretence and present tence i want to improve my skills that the reason i was access this site could you please help me how to learn from this site currectly
I don't see anything ambiguous about either form in terms of their implication(s) for the present. They are both about a past situation, and neither one implies anything about the present. In other words, the truth of the statement -- whichever of the two you choose -- is not incompatible with either "He visits her every Saturday now as well" or "He doesn't visit her every Saturday anymore".
____________

[He visited her every Saturday. / He used to visit her every Saturday.]

She moved away for two years, however, so he didn't visit her then.

[Now that she has moved back, he visits her every Saturday again. /

Now that she has moved back, he has gotten so out of the habit that he doesn't visit her every Saturday anymore. ]

_____________

What is implied, I think by both, is that the period in which the habit of visiting took place came to an end at some point in the past.

CJ
Yes, there's a difference.

1) He visited his mother every Saturday.
2) He used to visit his mother every Saturday.

Sentence 1 is just reporting John's past routine. Also, even though you have given no context, we can tell that the sentence before sentence 1 was about the past.

Sentence 2 is contrasting John's past routine with the present. So, sentence 2 is about the present AND the past. Therefore, it is possible that the sentence before this one had a PRESENT time reference.

Example:

John is really busy these days. For example, he used to visit his mother every Saturday, but these days, he hardly ever visits her.

You can’t substitute sentence 1 in this example.

I encourage you to think about how you would say this is your own language. In some languages, "used to" is expressed with an adverbial.
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