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Hello everyone,

A. In my country, in the primary schools or other schools students of the same grade cannot be fit in the same class room because they are outnumber, so they are divided into some groups, eg, "group A, group B, and group C" and them they are put in different classrooms. My question is: Can we call each group "branch" as follows?

branch A

branch B

branch C

B. Apart from "group", Are there any other ways to call them?

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Comments  
Joseph Aprimary schools or other schools

In this case it would be simpler to write this just as schools.

Joseph Acannot be fit in

It would be better to delete the second word.

Joseph Aclass room

Don't leave a space here.

Joseph Abecause they are outnumber,

This is not good. You could write it as because there are too many.

Joseph AMy question is: Can we call each group "branch" as follows?

This is unfamiliar but, after consideration, there is no obvious need to. Group seems fine.

Thank you so much, anonymous.

Are the words "track, stream, and section" fine too for this situation?

Best regards,

Joseph

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Joseph A My question is: Can we call each group "branch" as follows?

Around here (East Coast US), we call them classes, often by teacher's name. The third grade might comprise three classes—Mrs. Donovan's class, Miss Dugan's class and Ms Bluestocking's class.

Thank you, anonymous.

What about the words "stream (UK), track (US), and section? Are they fine for this situation?

Regards,

Joseph

I imagine each school's administration calls their divisions whatever they want. I am afraid I am not familiar with the modern jargon. But "track" as I understand it refers to a narrowing of focus, a specialization in course material for the purpose of preparing the student for the future, like an academic track for budding mathematicians or a vocational track for aspiring plumbers.

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Thank you so much, anonymous.
Joseph AAre the words "track, stream, and section" fine too for this situation?

From a British perspective, no. Track is only familiar from the article titled

Tracking (education)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tracking (education)


Your second suggestion is dated. It was used in schools before the 1990s.

Joseph Asection

This has no obvious use in your context. It's a strange choice.

Joseph AB. Apart from "group", Are there any other ways to call them?

The word classes was mentioned in another reply. If in your context you mean that a grade is divided into classes, see the first definition here https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/class you can use that word.


If you mean that each class is further divided, then the word group would be fine. It is simple and clear.


Which word to choose depends on which of the two definitions in this reply you mean. You should make that clear.

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