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Hello everyone,

I'm a teacher. When I set questions for my students, I write some information on the question paper. I'm not sure if some of the words are correct or not either in British English or American English. The words are "Year, class, grade", "section, group, track". Please look at the pictures below and tell me if I've used them correctly in both AE and BE. I need the comments from either side of the pond.



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In BE, we use 'Year'.

We use 'Subject' rather than 'Section', 'Group' or 'Track' — none of which make any sense to me.

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Rover_KEWe use 'Subject' rather than 'Section'

Thanks a lot.

Rover_KE, I think you misunderstood.

We have two sections: sciences and humanities. By "sciences", I refer to the group who studies "chemistry, biology, physics, and the languages", and by "humanities", I mean the other group who studies "economy, geography, history, and the languages. These two groups are housed in the same buildings, but their classrooms are different. Here I mean:

Section: humanities and sciences

Subject: English

Could you please tell me why I should use "subject" in place of "section"? Is it possible to write on the question paper as follows?

Subject: humanities and sciences

Section: English

PS. I teach both sections (groups) English, that's why I write as "humanities & sciences".

Joseph Asections

Regarding the way that you have used this word, as well as track and group does not fit in British English. In a school context, they are not used that way.

In the US, you might see the following:


School: Batman High School

Division: Humanities and Sciences

Subject: English

Track: Accelerated (or Advanced Placement)/Normal

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anonymousRegarding the way that you have used this word, as well as track and group does not fit in British English. In a school context, they are not used that way.

Thanks a lot.

Could you please tell me what I should use in place of "section" so that it is right in British English?

anonymousIn the US, you might see the following:School: Batman High SchoolDivision: Humanities and SciencesSubject: EnglishTrack: Accelerated (or Advanced Placement)/Normal

Thanks a lot.

Do you use "grade" in American English as follows?

Grade: 12

anonymousSchool: Batman High School

I'm sorry to be a bother. I've another two questions:

1. Isn't "coeducational" correct as follows?

School: Batman coeducational high school

2. Why have you capitalized every word? I'm as follows:

School: Batman High school

Not as follows:

School: Batman high school

PS. In my country, almost all the schools are named after people's name or cities' name, etc...

Here I used "Batman". It is the name of a city in Turkey.

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Joseph ACould you please tell me what I should use in place of "section" so that it is right in British English?

There wouldn't be anything in its place.


Your question is an example of a lesson to be learnt about learning languages. It is worth writing down and teaching to students. It is that while the same words exist in many parts of the world, they don't always mean the same thing. Track, group and section are used in the UK but, not in the context that you have used them.


If these are exact translations of the words in your first language, you can write them in English. You need to consider who your questions are for. Will your students know what these words mean in the education system of your part of the world? If the answer is yes, use them. If the answer is no, you can either avoid those words or give an explanation first.

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