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Hello.

I would like to know why we usually need voiced sound after voiced and voiceless after voiceless sounds.

For example: Passed -> The ending 'ed' is pronounced as /t/ because the sound preceding 'ed' is voiceless so we pronounce 'ed' as /t/ (voiceless).

Similarly, in hugs, we pronounce the 's' as /z/ (voiced) because the preceding sound is voiced (/g/).

I know one reason: because it is easy to pronounce voiced sound after another voiced sound and voiceless sound after voiceless sound; however, I would like to know whether there's another sensible reason for that.

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Riyan KhanI would like to know whether there's another sensible reason for that.

No, there's no other reason. There's no extra mystery or magic that you're missing. The vocal tract works the same way in all parts of the world, so you'll find this kind of thing in many of the world's languages.

CJ