+0
How would you say this please?

I'm not going to wait on/for you (in order) to buy that just because you can get me a discount.

I'm not going to wait after you (in order) to buy that just because you can get me a discount. I'm just going to go head and buy it because if I have to wait for/on/after you, I'll buy it in 2 years.

Thank you
1 2
Comments  
I've heard them all, but "wait after you" is a bit unusual in the US.
I'm not going to wait on/for you (in order) to buy that just because you can get me a discount.

I'm not going to wait on you to buy that just because you can get me a discount would mean that you are not going to wait for the other person who is entitled to the discount to purchase the item at a discount for you. Using "for you to buy that" means the same thing. In both cases, it would mean that the person who is being spoken to is the person entitled to the discount, and the speaker is not willing to wait for them to go buy the object, give it to them, and for the speaker to, presumably, repay them for the discounted price.

Saying "not going to wait on you" could also mean that the speaker is not going to wait for the person who is entitled to the discount to accompany them to the store, while the speaker buys the object, using the listener's discount.

I'm not going to wait after you (in order) to buy that just because you can get me a discount. I'm just going to go head and buy it because if I have to wait for/on/after you, I'll buy it in 2 years.

Wait "after you" is never correct. You could say either, "I'm not going to wait for you" or, "I'm not going to wait on you" to buy it. Eliminate the "that just"

So, the sentence should read: "I'm not going to wait for (or on) you to buy that just because you can get me a discount. I'm just going to go ahead and buy it (presumably at full price), because, if I have to wait for (or on) you, I won't buy it for two years.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
alc24I'm not going to wait after you (in order) to buy that just because you can get me a discount. I'm just going to go head and buy it because if I have to wait for/on/after you, I'll buy it in 2 years.
Emotion: shake

I'm not going to wait for you to buy it just so you can get me discount. If I wait for you, I'll still be waiting two years from now. I'm just going to go ahead and buy it now.

wait on is substandard in my opinion, and wait after is impossible.

wait on is what a server in a restaurant does. He (or she) waits on the customers.

CJ
Hello,

I'm sorry, I know I'm not the original poster, but I'm interested in this topic and just have a few questions. Please advise. Thank you.
CalifJimwait on is what a server in a restaurant does. He (or she) waits on the customers.
What does "wait on", that is what a server in a restaurant does, mean?

Can I also say "He (the server) waits for the customers,"?
How is "wait for" different in meaning from "wait on" in the same sentence?
AnonymousWhat does "wait on", that is what a server in a restaurant does, mean?
Can I also say "He (the server) waits for the customers,"?
How is "wait for" different in meaning from "wait on" in the same sentence?
The manager of the restaurant opens the restaurant early in the morning. He waits for the waiters (servers), cooks, and other employees to come to work. They arrive. Now the manager and the waiters wait for the customers to arrive. As groups of customers arrive, they are seated. Each group of customers is waited on by a waiter. The waiter takes the customers' orders, and when the food is ready, the waiter takes it to the table where the customers are seated. That is, he waits on the customers. After the customers are finished eating, they wait for the check. The waiter who is waiting on those customers brings the check. During the course of a busy day, a waiter may wait on 80 to 100 customers.

CJ
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thank you very, CJ, for that comprehensive example.

If I've understood, "wait on" in your example means something like serving or attending to the group of customers seated, whereas "wait for" simply means waiting for something to happen or arrive.

I hope I've got the right idea. Emotion: smile

Again, thank you so much.
AnonymousI hope I've got the right idea.
You have. Emotion: smile

CJ
Wait on, in the context of wait for, is used in casual speech, but I wouldn't use it in writing unless the context was also casual (e.g., e-mail or text to a friend). As Jim points out, wait on, for standard usage, means to provide some type of service for.

But, one hears "wait on" all the time. Earlier this week on the news shows reporting the election coverage, it was ubiquitous among the pundits. e.g., "We'll have to wait on the results from X state before we will know who controls the Senate." It is not jarring to the ear, even for most educated speakers, but, "wait for" is preferable.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more