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Hi teachers,



From The Guardian by David Hosp

Is "wait on a line" correct in American English? Do British English speakers consider the phrase wrong and do they think it should be "wait in a line"?
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Comments  
I believe the British (and Canadians?) use 'stand in queue'. Americans stand 'in line'. I've heard 'on line' before, but I can't generalize about its location.
Americans use "in line", generally "waiting on..." means the same as "waiting for". So, in AmE, someone waiting on a line, would be away from the line, and would join it when it thins out.
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I think it sounds odd, although COCA lists a handful of examples of the usage. I sought a second opinion from someone who arrived here in the US two days ago from Britain, and she said that in a line sounds fine to her, but on a line does not.
If you want to use the word 'queue', it's
eg They are standing in a queue.
eg They are queuing up.

Clive
BarbaraPA :
In one of the most localized linguistic oddities I've come across, New Yorkers wait "on" line. I've never heard it elsewhere.

http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/ThereTourGroupInclude/bvzvvz/post.htm
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CliveThey are queuing up.
Can I change the imperative sentence here into imperative one?

E.X. Queue up!
Yes.
Odessa Dawn Can I change the imperative sentence here into imperative one?

E.X. Queue up!
Sorry, it should have written - Can I change the affirmative sentence here into imperative one?
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