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Hi, which one is correct: "He walks towards the store," or "He walks toward the store"? I've seen a lot of people use both, and I was wondering which one is correct.
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He walked towards the store.
Hm, so it can't be the present tense of "to walk"? Could you explain why?
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'Towards' is a preposition used to indicate movement to a particular direction at that moment.

In your sentence, 'he walks towards the store', it would mean that he is going on walking towards the store,which of course, is not possible. The action has ended by the time you're saying it. Hence it should be written in the past tense.walks is present continous.

If, however, you are really watching him while walking towards the store, and you say it aloud, then you can say: He is walking towards the store.

Hope you got it now.

Savvy
Ohh, I understand now! Thank you, Savvysavz, for your help.Emotion: big smile
EggsumHi, which one is correct: "He walks towards the store," or "He walks toward the store"? I've seen a lot of people use both, and I was wondering which one is correct.
As a native English speaker, I use both. AND I use them in the present tense.
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In addition, we often use the present tense to report a past event.

"You won't believe what happened yesterday! I was watching Dan in the shopping centre. Well, he walks towards this guy and punches him right in the face. Then the police come and drag him away. It was unreal!"

I'm not saying that it's right, but you'll hear it a lot.
Yes. Both toward and towards mean the same thing. (I don't know why we have both forms.)
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