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Which one of these is current to use
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When used as a verb, it must be "walk through". ("Let's walk through this.")

When used as a noun, "walkthrough" and "walk-through" are both OK. I would personally use the hyphenated version.
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What sources are you using for this? For example, Merriam-Webster only lists "walk-through" as correct. It it provides it as a noun. There is no verb entry for walk-through (or any of its variations). I would love to see the breakdown of these words in a dictionary or other source. Thanks!

anonymous

What sources are you using for this? For example, Merriam-Webster only lists "walk-through" as correct. It it provides it as a noun. There is no verb entry for walk-through (or any of its variations). I would love to see the breakdown of these words in a dictionary or other source. Thanks!

GPY wasn't trying to say that walk through is a verb. The OP didn't specify how the combination was to be used, so GPY explained that if the verb walk is followed by through they must be separated. The noun may be written with or without a hyphen, though the hyphenated version is probably more common and not all dictionaries list the unhyphenated version. Macmillan is one that does.

We can have a walk through

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For what it's worth, the OED spells the main entry for the noun and adjective "walkthrough". They don't seem to care much how such a word is spelled, though, showing citations for the one-word form and the hyphenated form willy-nilly. The word has various related definitions you can easily imagine. They call "an inspection carried out on foot" "Chiefly North American", and the first citation is from 1971. The first citation for the computer gaming walkthrough is from 1988, and all three citations for that are the one-word form. The oldest citation for any definition is from 1920.