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Suppose I visit London and I am staying in my friend's home. After my lunch I decided to wander off to visit churches around that particular street or city or area. How should I say it to my friend? I can think of like the following :

I am going to wander off to visit churches in this vicinity.

Is this sentence correct?
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Colloquial and informal and very usual.: I'm going to take a stroll and have a look at some of the churches around here.

Formal - : I'm going out for a walk and hope to visit some of the churches in this district.
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Feebs, "take a stroll" was exactly what I was thinking too.

You can "wander around" and "take in the sights" but as Philip says, don't "wander off." That's entirely different.
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User_garySuppose I visit London and I am staying in my friend's home. After my lunch I decided to wander off to visit churches around that particular street or city or area. How should I say it to my friend? I can think of like the following :

I am going to wander off to visit churches in this vicinity.

Is this sentence correct?

"Wander off" can, but not necessarily, imply that there was another route that had been planned on. [We were shopping together, and then at some point she just wandered off to I don't know where.]
 BarbaraPA's reply was promoted to an answer.
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