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1. I want my car repaired immediately.

2. I want my car to be repaired immediately.

#1 is supposed to be correct. Is #2 also acceptable?
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Absolutely! (Boy!, we're really easing into this one.) A.
sitifan1. I want my car repaired immediately.

2. I want my car to be repaired immediately.

#1 is supposed to be correct. Is #2 also acceptable?

Both are fine. I think most people use the first.

CJ
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AvangiAbsolutely! (Boy!, we're really easing into this one.) A.

What do you mean we're really easing into this one?
I guess I sensed a trap. Your OP example uses very common language, but raises some extremely complex issues, as your OP's often do. I used to think you were being mischievous, but my colleagues have convinced me of the purity of your purpose.

I hope you'll forgive me for having a suspicious mind. I now look forward to your posts.

(To ease into something is to broach a difficult subject in a delicate way which will not cause alarm; or in a more physical sense, to enter cautiously so as not to cause damage or lose control, as a racing driver easing into a turn.)

(You may now drop the other shoe.)

- A.
AvangiI guess I sensed a trap. Your OP example uses very common language, but raises some extremely complex issues, as your OP's often do. I used to think you were being mischievous, but my colleagues have convinced me of the purity of your purpose.

I hope you'll forgive me for having a suspicious mind. I now look forward to your posts.

(To ease into something is to broach a difficult subject in a delicate way which will not cause alarm; or in a more physical sense, to enter cautiously so as not to cause damage or lose control, as a racing driver easing into a turn.)

(You may now drop the other shoe.)

I am a Taiwanese teacher of English. I hope to teach my students "correct" English.

The English tests in Taiwan are full of poorly-constructed questions. That's why I sometimes post "strange" questions. I have never tried to catch anyone out. I hold master's a degree in linguistics, so I can read scholarly English. However, I am not a native speaker and often have difficuty understaning the colloquial phrases you use.

BTW, what do you mean by OP? What do you mean You may now drop the other shoe?
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Hi Sitifan,
I am not a native, nor do I have the credential like yours. But I have studied English for over 25 years. I see your posted question this way.

I want my car fixed once and for all - This is probably something an angry car own would say to a mechanic after numerous times of bringing back the car to him.

I want my car to be fxed - Although grammatically is correct, it is no very idomatic and not very natural sounding in my humble opinion.
How would you like your steak cooked? -A waiter may ask you? Not to be cooked.
I am Chinese and I understand how some of the poor English materials are written in our home land as many are written by sub-par professionals and I don't mean it in a mean way. Just my 2 cents ....
sitifan BTW, what do you mean by OP? What do you mean You may now drop the other shoe?
I picked up "OP" from this site. It's a handy shorthand when you're deep into a thread and wish to mention or refer to the original question which was asked. I was never sure if it correctly refers to "Original Post" or "Original Poster."

"Waiting for the other shoe to drop" is a useful and quite common native expression refering to an imaginary scenario in a rooming house. The guy in a downstairs room has been trying to get to sleep, but the guy in the room above him is still quite active, and is keeping him awake. Finally the guy upstairs seems to be preparing to retire. One of his shoes hits the floor with a loud "bang." The downstairs guy had been dozing, but is now wide awake. I'm sure you can figure out the rest.

In referring to your recent OP, I was implying that I have grown accustomed to a certain pattern. (It's a good one, BTW. If you thoroughly explain a complex question, we often take a look at what you've written and throw up our hands. Too lengthy! Too complicated! Pick another one!)

But you wisely ask a short, simple question; and we take the bait, failing to notice that your example is fraught with peril. So we are hooked, and can't resist following through as the plot unfolds.

I thought I'd beat you to the punch (another metaphor), but the car-fixing example turned out to be beyond my capabilities. CJ didn't elaborate on it either, and I was sure you'd be coming back with the second part to the question - the second shoe, so to speak.

So let's have it. I'm anxious to hear your thoughts on these seemingly inocuous, but crazy structures!

Best regards, - A.
Sorry, I hit the wrong button and posted a full quote of your previous post. They've changed the delete post option, so all I could do was edit the post to a single period, and hope I could hurry to finish. - A.
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