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Neither the letters nor the memo (was/were) on your desk.

I feel really (bad/badly) about what you said to me.

The accident was (due to/because of) the driver's negligence.
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Hi,

Neither the letters nor the memo (was) on your desk.

Neither/ either/ any/ someone etc.....always takes on the singular verb form

I feel really (bad) about what you said to me.

The sensing verbs are the only exceptions that can use adjectives

Ex: It feels good , I fine fine

She looks terrific, He looks weird

The wine tastes too try.

The accident was (due to the result of ) the driver's negligence. personally, I think due/ because of are understood. But I gave you another option to consider.
GoodmanNeither the letters nor the memo (was) on your desk.

Neither/ either/ any/ someone etc.....always takes on the singular verb form

Neither is paired with nor as either is with or, and in those uses as conjunctions they pose usage problems of agreement. Usually they will take a singular verb if both parts of the structure are singular, as in Neither he nor his friend is ready, and if the first element is plural but the second element remains singular, the structure may still take a singular verb, as in Neither my friends nor my father is ready, although a plural is also possible. But if the second element is plural, the verb will almost always be plural: Neither my father nor his friends are ready. Agreement between neither/nor and the verb is frequently a matter of notional agreement: hence Standard English in all but its most Formal and Oratorical situations will usually accept either number of the verb.

From http://www.bartleby.com/68/47/4047.html .

Though that was taken from a guide to American English, I believe that the rule above is appropriate for British English too. Native BrE speakers, correct me please if I wrong.

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Ruslana
GoodmanNeither the letters nor the memo (was) on your desk.

Neither/ either/ any/ someone etc.....always takes on the singular verb form


Neither is paired with nor as either is with or, and in those uses as conjunctions they pose usage problems of agreement. Usually they will take a singular verb if both parts of the structure are singular, as in Neither he nor his friend is ready, and if the first element is plural but the second element remains singular, the structure may still take a singular verb, as in Neither my friends nor my father is ready, although a plural is also possible. But if the second element is plural, the verb will almost always be plural: Neither my father nor his friends are ready. Agreement between neither/nor and the verb is frequently a matter of notional agreement: hence Standard English in all but its most Formal and Oratorical situations will usually accept either number of the verb.

From http://www.bartleby.com/68/47/4047.html .

Though that was taken from a guide to American English, I believe that the rule above is appropriate for British English too. Native BrE speakers, correct me please if I wrong.

As I always believe, learning is on going; including English which I love. As a question was raised by
Ruslana, I was so curious as to whether or not I misunderstood all along about the use of “Neither”.
So I did some “Googling” which I thought I’d like to share with you here.


Neither Don nor Donna is playing hooky. (CORRECT); Neither Don nor I am playing .. (CORRECT); She and he are always fighting.When Toni and he come over, ...

Gm- Good day!

(edited to try to fix format--MM)

Hi,

When "neither..nor", "either..or" ..etc are used as correlative conjuctions, the verb should agree in number with the noun that is closer to the verb.

(E-x) Neither my friend nor my teachers are coming.

Neither my teachers nor my friend is coming.
Yes, Krish, I agree with you.

Goodman, the most interesting is that while "Googling" I saw [url=http://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/subjectVerbAgree.asp ]the Blue Book site[/url] too but decided to give the information from the other resourse. [:)]
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Hi all,

You know, that goes to show, not all the teachers and sources are absolutely correct. Now I am really interested to find out the truth!Emotion: surprise
Niether / or question and usage

Searching findings:

If two singular subjects are connected by neither . . . nor or either . . . or, the verb must be singular as well.

• Neither Spiderman nor Batman is going to the party.

• Either Slim or Roger has to leave town before someone gets hurt.

If one singular subject and one plural subject are connected by neither . . . nor or either . . . or, match the verb with whichever subject it’s closer to.

• Neither Olivia nor the boys eat mushrooms.

• Neither the boys nor Olivia eats mushrooms.

• Either one rat or several mice are eating everything in the cupboard.

• Either several mice or one rat is eating everything in the cupboard.

On another search, it said:

He will not permit the change or (or nor) even consider it. In noun phrases of the type no this or that, or is actually more common than nor: He has no experience or interest (less frequently nor interest) in chemistry. Or is also more common than nor when such a noun phrase, adjective phrase, or adverb phrase is introduced by not: He is not a philosopher or a statesman. They were not rich or happy.

clause), you can use either or or nor: He will not permit the change or (or nor) even consider it. In noun phrases of the type no this or that, or is actually more common than nor: He has no experience or interest (less frequently nor interest) in chemistry. Or is also more common than nor when such a noun phrase, adjective phrase, or adverb phrase is introduced by not: He is not a philosopher or a statesman. They were not rich or happy.

I think I know why we have varying opinions here. When I made my posting, I had neither and either in mind as singular form because that was the original posted question. So all the references I made was based on that premise. After doing some searching, I think we are all correct.

Now, let me give it another twist. If I were to say:

“Neither I nor my friends are going to the party”- This is correct; isn’t it?

Now if I reword it to “Neither my friends nor I [was/ am /are] going to the party” which one is correct? since "I" is the noun closea to the verb?

I promise, I will leave it at that.
Anonymous

Now, let me give it another twist. If I were to say:

Now if I reword it to “Neither my friends nor I [was/ am /are] going to the party” which one is correct? since "I" is the noun closea to the verb? I promise, I will leave it at that.

"am" or "was" depending upon the context.
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