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Hello, everyone! I have a question and need your help!

I have to change the past sentence #1 into the present one, #2.

#1. There was a flower garden outside the window. We could see that someone had been walking in the flower bed. Many of the flower were broken.

#2. There is a flower garden outside the window. We can see that someone in the flower bed. Many of the flower are broken.

has been walking..? or was walking? If they are both possible, I'd like to know the difference. For example, can I say: if nobody is in the flower garden now, then you should use . ???
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Hi guest,

I'd use "has been walking". The walk has an effect on the present -- the flower stems are broken.

Just my 2 cents.
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This is actually rather formulaic. was > is; could > can; had > has; were > are.
There's no reason to make it more complicated than that!

CJ
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Comments  
Since we know that "has been walking" is a possibilty and a strong one at that, I'd say that Jim's contention is too simplistic. Life and language are not formulaic. Context and, at least equally as important, what the speaker wishes to relay, would determine language choice.

There is a flower garden outside the window. We [can] see that someone in the flower bed. Many of the flowers HAVE BEEN broken.

Other choices, eg. the deletion of 'can' or the addition of HAVE BEEN, illustrate other nuances available to speakers.
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