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Hi Emotion: smile,

I was currently reading in my english book, when I encountered a phrase that I admittedly understood, but it seemed to me that there's a grammatical error.

I'm going to show you a little excerpt that's about youth culture in the 20th century, just to give you some background:

And what the advertisers could not achieve, peer pressure did: it was your own friends who would laugh at you if you were not wearing the right clothes or listening to the right music.

Hasn't it to be either: it was your own friend who would laugh at you... or it were your own friends who would laugh at you... ?

To me the sentence doesn't make any sense, is this expression colloquial or must it be a mistake by the producers of the book?

Alex
Comments  
When "it" is used as the subject of a sentence/clause it's followed by a singular verb. (it was your own friend/friends)
I think I got it, with "friends" the circle of friends is meant. That would make sense. Other opinions?
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Alex-93I think I got it, with "friends" the circle of friends is meant. That would make sense. Other opinions?


No.

Please refer to my previous post.
Ivanhr
Alex-93I think I got it, with "friends" the circle of friends is meant. That would make sense. Other opinions?

No.

Please refer to my previous post.

Now I understood what you meant. It is followed by a singular verb, thanks Emotion: smile
The plural of friends confused me.
Alex-93Hasn't it to be either: it was your own friend who would laugh at you... or it were your own friends who would laugh at you... ?
No. Not at all. See WH cleft and follow the links.

CJ
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Thanks CJ !! Emotion: smile